• Bromegrass in Alaska. III. Effects of Planting Dates, and Time of Seeding-Year Harvest, on Seeding-Year Forage Yields and Quality, Winter Survival, and Second-Year Spring Forage Yield

      Klebesadel, Leslie J. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1993-12)
      Objectives of this study were to (a) determine yields and quality of forage that could be obtained in the seeding year from smooth bromegrass (Bromus inermis) seeded in spring without a cereal companion crop, and (b) determine whether planting dates and date of the seeding-year harvest influenced subsequent winter survival and forage yield in the following year. Bromegrass plots were harvested for forage yield once during the seeding year on several dates approximately 10 days apart during August, September, and early October; effects of those harvest dates were measured by comparing yields of all plots harvested on the same date in the second year of growth. Five of the six experiments were conducted at the University of Alaska’s Matanuska Research Farm (61.6oN) near Palmer in southcentral Alaska, and the other was at the Research Center in Palmer.
    • Bromegrass in Alaska. IV. Effects of Various Schedules and Frequencies of Harvest on Forage Yields and Quality and on Subsequent Winter Survival of Several Strains

      Klebesadel, Leslie J. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1994-10)
      Effects of different annual harvest schedules and frequencies on several cultivars and strains of bromegrass (Bromus species) were measured in five field experiments at the University of Alaska’s Matanuska Research Farm (61.6oN) near Palmer in southcentral Alaska. Most cultivars evaluated and compared were smooth bromegrass (B. inermis Leyss.). Native Alaskan pumpelly bromegrass (B. pumpellianus Scribn.) and the predominantly hybrid (B. inermis x B. pumpellianus) cultivar Polar, developed in Alaska, were included also.
    • Comparative Winterhardiness of Cultivated and Native Alaskan Grasses, and Forage Yield and Quality as Influenced by Harvest Schedules and Frequencies, and Rates of Applied Nitrogen

      Klebesadel, Leslie J. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1994-07)
      Objectives of this investigation were to compare certain traditional forage grasses with several native Alaskan grass species for forage yield, forage quality as measured by percent crude protein and digestibility (in vitro dry-matter disappearance or percent IVDMD), and comparative winterhardiness in three separate experiments. Management variables included different harvest frequencies (2, 3, and 4 times per year), and five different rates of applied nitrogen (N). Experiments were conducted at the University of Alaska’s Matanuska Research Farm (61.6oN) near Palmer in southcentral Alaska. All species were tall-growing, cool-season perennials. Traditional forage grasses included ‘Polar’ hybrid bromegrass (predominantly Bromus inermis x B. pumpellianus), ‘Engmo’ timothy (Phleum pratense), ‘Garrison’ creeping foxtail (Alopecurus arundinaceus), and a non-cultivar, commercial meadow foxtail (A. pratensis). Native Alaskan species were Siberian wildrye (Elymus sibiricus), slender wheatgrass (Agropyron trachycaulum), arctic wheatgrass (A. sericeum), bluejoint (Calamagrostis canadensis), and polargrass (Arctagrostis arundinacea).