• Interannual and spatial variation in the population genetic composition of young-of-the-year Pacific Ocean Perch (Sebastes alutus) in Alaskan waters

      Kamin, Lisa M.; Gharrett, Anthony J.; Heifetz, Jonathan; Tallmon, David (2010-05)
      We know little about the population structure of Gulf of Alaska (GOA) and Bering Sea rockfish, including Pacific ocean perch (POP, Sebastes alutus), and early life history information is sparse for many rockfish species. Young-of-the-year (YOY) POP were collected with surface trawls during surveys of juvenile salmon in the GOA and Bering Sea. These samples presented a unique opportunity to study POP genetics and life history. Fourteen microsatellite loci were used to characterize the genetic variation in POP collected in a total of 45 hauls over five years. The coincidence in timing and location of several collections between years allowed examination of both fine- and broad-scale geographic variation (within cohorts) as well as interannual (between cohorts) genetic variation. The geographic genetic structure of these collections was also compared to geographic structure of adult POP described in a previous study (Palof, 2008). As in the adult study, significant broad-scale geographic divergence was observed in YOY POP in the GOA. Fine-scale geographic divergence was also observed and may be the result of variable current regimes and oceanographic features at several locations. The limited amount of temporal variation observed seems to be the result of variable oceanography and fine-scale population structure rather than the influence of a sweepstakes effect. The relationship between genetic divergence and geographic separation is virtually identical in YOY and adult POP, which confirms that dispersal of POP is limited in all life stages and also demonstrates that most YOY are produced by adults that are located nearby.
    • Population genetic structure of Alaskan Pacific ocean perch (Sebastes alutus)

      Palof, Katie J.; Gharrett, Anthony J.; Heifetz, Jonathan; Hillgruber, Nicola (2008-05)
      Knowledge of the population structure of a species is essential for its effective management and sustained production. Although Pacific ocean perch (Sebastes alutus, POP) is an important species both economically and ecologically, little is known about its population structure and life history in Alaskan waters. The objectives of this study were to describe the population structure of POP in terms of the numbers and geographic scale oflocal populations, their connectivity, and the compatibility of that structure with current management. Fourteen micro satellite loci were used to characterize the population structure genetically in eleven geographically distinct collections from sites along the continental shelf from the Queen Charlotte Islands to the Bering Sea. In spite of the many opportunities for most life stages to disperse, there was strong geographically related genetic structure (Fst =0.0123, p <10⁻⁵). Adults appear to belong to neighborhoods that exchange genetic information at relatively small spatial scales (14 to 90 km). Although this suggests limited movement, connectivity is evidenced by the isolation-by-distance relationship, the apparent northwestward movement of gene flow in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA), and the break in geneflow in the central GOA. The observed population structure has a finer geographic scale than management areas, which suggests that current fisheries management should be revisited.