• Enhancing the clinical supervision process for beginning mental health professionals

      Callahan, Adie; Gifford, Valerie; Renes, Susan; Simpson, Joni (2016)
      Using current research, this project discovers and compiles the pertinent information students need to know to successfully utilize supervision. Supervision was established as a field competency after the American Psychological Association's 2002 Multinational Competencies Conference. Since then, the mental health field has made strides in defining, standardizing, and evaluating the process of supervision. Students' awareness and ability to effectively use supervision is still gaining momentum, as the professionals in the field develop an infrastructure to train student development of knowledge, skills, and abilities related to the utilization of supervision. This project's application establishes a supplemental booklet for students in the University of Alaska Fairbanks School of Education's Counseling Program to use throughout supervision in practicum, internship, and as an early career mental health professional. Teaching students about supervision while they are in school sets the foundation for the developing competency of helping skills, delivering of quality client care, and becoming effective supervisors later in their careers.
    • Identifying and working with non-responsive and deteriorating patients within the process of supervision: methods of practicing supervisors

      Rast, Katrina Anne; Gifford, Valerie; David, Eric John; Geist, Charles; Lardon, Cecile; Whipple, Jason (2018-05)
      Clinical supervision is widely considered to be an essential part of psychotherapy training, encouraging trainee growth, and ensuring the best possible outcome for patients. The use of routine outcome monitoring (ROM) systems in clinical practice has been shown to be beneficial in improving patient outcome within psychotherapy. In addition to its utility in clinical practice, research has suggested that the use of ROM systems and patient feedback within the supervisory process may also have a positive impact on patient outcome. Despite these potential benefits, there is no existing literature about how supervisors identify and work with patients at risk for deterioration within the supervision process. This study aimed to explore the influence on regulatory focus and the use of ROM systems within supervision. Additionally, this study sought to explore two questions: 1) How do supervisors currently identify supervisee patients who are unresponsive to treatment or deteriorating? and 2) How do supervisors currently work with unresponsive or deteriorating patients in supervision? Using a quantitative approach, results suggest that the majority of supervisors rely heavily on clinical judgment in order to identify treatment non-responders and irregularly use ROM systems in order to identify these patients. In addition, the results suggest that the majority of supervisors respond to deteriorating patients in a way that coincides with existing literature pertaining to common practices within psychotherapy. Furthermore, there appears to be a prominent lack of understanding of the purpose and use of ROM systems within supervision. Finally, results indicate that promotion scores are a predictor of the use of ROM within supervision. Implications for research and clinical practices are discussed, in addition to limitations and future directions of the study.