• Bromegrass in Alaska. I.Winter Survival and Forage Productivity of Bromus Species, Types, and Cultivars as Related to Latitudinal Adaptation

      Klebesadel, Leslie J.; Helm, D. J. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1992-05)
      This report summarizes seven separate field experiments, conducted over more than two decades at the University of Alaska’s Matanuska Research Farm, that compared strains within three bromegrass (Bromus) species for winter hardiness and forage production. Species were (a) smooth bromegrass (B. inermis Leyss.), (b) native Alaskan pumpelly bromegrass (B. pumpellianus Scribn.), and (c) meadow bromegrass (B. biebersteinii Roem. and Schult.), a species native to southwestern Asia.
    • Bromegrass in Alaska. II. Autumn Food-Reserve Storage, Freeze Tolerance, and Dry-Matter Concentration in Overwintering Tissues as Related to Winter Survival of Latitudinal Ecotypes

      Klebesadel, Leslie J. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1993-05)
      The objective of this study was to acquire improved understanding of factors that influence winter survival of bromegrass (Bromus spp.) at northern latitudes. Four bromegrass strains of diverse latitudinal origins were used: (a) native Alaskan pumpelly bromegrass (B. pumpellianus Scribn.) adapted at 61° to 65°N, (b) the Alaska hybrid cultivar Polar (predominantly B. inermis Leyss. x B. pumpellianus) selected at 61.6°N, and two smooth bromegrass (B. inermis) cultivars, (c) Manchar selected in the U.S. Pacific Northwest (43° to 47°N), and (d) Achenbach originating from Kansas (34° to 42°N).
    • Bromegrass in Alaska. VI. Effects of a Broad Array of Harvest Schedules and Frequencies on Forage Yield and Quality and on Subsequent Winter Survival of Cultivars Manchar and Polar

      Klebesadel, Leslie J. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1997-09)
      Objectives of this study were to compare several schedules and frequencies of forage harvest of smooth bromegrass (Bromus inermis Leyss.): (a) for distribution of forage yields and total productivity in the year of differential harvests, (b) for percent crude protein in herbage in the various cuttings and for yields of crude protein, (c) for determining rates of growth (production of herbage dry matter) during the growing season, and (d) for effects of those different harvest schedules and frequencies on subsequent winter survival and on stand health and vigor the following year as measured by a uniform evaluation harvest in late June or early July. Two bromegrass cultivars, mid–temperate–adapted Manchar and subarctic–adapted Polar, were utilized in four experiments (Manchar in two, Polar in two) conducted at the University of Alaska’s Matanuska Research Farm (61.6°N) near Palmer in the Matanuska Valley in southcentral Alaska.
    • Relationship of Latitude-of-Origin to Winter Survival and to Forage and Seed Yields of Wheatgrass (Agropyron species) in Subarctic Alaska

      Klebesadel, Leslie J.; Helm, D. J. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1992-07)
      Five field experiments evaluating and comparing numerous grasses were conducted over seven years at the Matanuska Research Farm (61.6°N) near Palmer in southcentral Alaska. Grasses were 34 strains within 14 species of wheatgrass (Agropyron) derived from various geographic areas spanning 32 degrees of latitude; also included were the intergeneric hybrid Agroelymus palmerensis Lepage, Siberian wildrye (Elymus sibiricus L.), two bromegrass (Bromus) cultivars, and one timothy (Phleum pratense L.) cultivar. They were grown in broadcast-seeded plots for forage (two cuts per year), in drilled rows for seed production, and as individual plants in rows for winter-survival determinations.