• Effects of Daily Photoperiod/Nyctoperiod and Temperature on Autumn Development of Crown Buds and Dormanc y, Freeze Tolerance, and Storage of Food Reserves in Latitudinal Ecotypes of Biennial White Sweetclover

      Klebesadel, Leslie J. (1993-11)
      The investigation consisted of both an outdoor experiment and one conducted indoors in controlledenvironment chambers. Objectives were to determine during late-summer/autumn the effects of (a) the changing daily light/dark (photoperiod/nyctoperiod) pattern, and (b) seasonally lowering temperatures on pre-winter behavior of sweetclover. Measurements were made of certain morphological characteristics and various facets of the winter-hardening process. Both experiments were conducted at the University of Alaska’s Palmer Research Center (61.6°N) in southcentral Alaska.
    • Extreme Northern Acclimatization in Biennial Yellow Sweetclover (Melilotus officinalis) at the Arctic Circle

      Klebesadel, Leslie J. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1992-09)
      Biennial sweetclovers (Melilotus spp.) are among the most winter-hardy of the legumes used as forage crops (Bula and Smith 1954; Gorz and Smith 1973; Hodgson and Bula 1956; Klebesadel 1971b, 1980). Common strains and cultivars of both yellow-flowered (M. officinalis [L.] Lam.) and white-flowered (M. alba Desr.) species are grown extensively in the Middle West and Great Plains areas of the United States (Gorz and Smith 1973), and the prairie provinces of Canada (Greenshields 1957). However, due to inadequate winter hardiness in Alaska of strains currently available (Hodgson and Bula 1956; Irwin 1945; Klebesadel 1971b, 1980), sweetclovers from other areas are not dependable for use as biennials in southcentral Alaska.
    • Morphological, Physiological, and Winterhardiness Comparisons Among Latitudinal Ecotypes of Biennial Sweetclover (Melilotus species) in Subarctic Alaska

      Klebesadel, Leslie J. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1992-11)
      Objectives of this study were to compare, within two species of biennial sweetclover, several morphological and physiological characteristics of strains adapted to a wide range of latitudes and to relate those characteristics to winter survival and forage production in subarctic Alaska. All experiments were conducted at the University of Alaska’s Matanuska Research Farm (61.6°N) near Palmer in southcentral Alaska.
    • Responses of Biennial Sweetclovers of Diverse Latitudinal Adaptation to Various Management Procedures in Alaska

      Klebesadel, Leslie J. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1994-06)
      This report summarizes eight experiments with sweetclover (Melilotus species). Objectives were (a) determine responses of numerous cultivars and strains, representing a wide range of latitudinal adaptation, to various management procedures, (b) identify management options that contribute to improved winter survival, (c) delineate management procedures for maximizing yields, nutritional value, and usefulness of sweetclover for forage production in Alaska, and (d) identify logical avenues for future management research with sweetclover in this north-latitude area. Species of sweetclover included were biennial yellow (M. officinalis), biennial white (M. alba), and annual white (M. alba var. annua). All experiments except one were conducted at the University of Alaska’s Matanuska Research Farm (61.6oN) near Palmer in southcentral Alaska; one experiment was conducted at the Fairbanks Experiment Farm (64.9oN) in central Alaska’s Tanana Valley.