• Alaska Native civics & government high school curriculum

      Wassillie, Katya (2017-05)
      This curriculum document provides an outline for teaching important subject matter related to Alaska Native civics and government to high school students in Alaska. The development of this document was inspired by the current deficit of these subjects in Alaskan high school curricula statewide. This subject matter is highly relevant to Alaskan students, particularly Alaska Native students, in that it covers historical events, themes, and other topics that have direct application to their lives and/or adds to their understanding of social, political, and legal structures that surround them. Learning about the topics included in this curriculum will prepare Alaska Native high school students for leadership and involvement in institutions and organizations within their communities and statewide, such as Alaska Native corporations and tribal governments. Non-Alaska Native high school students will also benefit from a greater understanding of this history and these institutions that are major components of Alaskan society. The subject matter is organized into six broad content areas, labeled "units." Each unit includes several specific content areas, labeled "lessons," that fall under the broader unit topic. The main component of each lesson is the learning objectives for students. This document does not provide materials or instructions for teaching the subject matter, but is meant to serve as a guide for educators to use in building lesson plans. However, ideas and suggestions for developing lesson plans have been included within each lesson as resources for educators. Six educational videos based on each of the unit topics in the curriculum have also been developed as resources for educators, along with a list of books, videos, articles, and websites that cover information related to the curriculum subject matter. Unfortunately, textbooks and other teaching materials for this curriculum do not yet exist, but much of the information and resources needed to implement this curriculum are available on the Internet, many of which have been listed in the database provided with this document. Lastly, because the subject matter included in this curriculum document is both extensive and complex, it is suggested that this curriculum be taught throughout the course of an academic year.
    • Analysis of energy consumption on the environmental Kuznets curve hypothesis in the United States: does renewable energy play a role?

      Ohnesorge, Michelle; Little, Joseph; Baek, Jungho; Greenberg, Joshua (2018-05)
      Using CO₂ emissions as a representation of environmental degradation an empirical econometric analysis is conducted to see if there is evidence of an Environmental Kuznets Curve in the United States and if renewable energy consumption plays a significant role in CO₂ emission mitigation. The renewable energy consumption variable was broken down further to isolate geothermal, hydroelectric, biomass, solar, and wind energy consumption and explore their role in the analysis. An Auto-Regressive Distributed Lag approach to cointegration with Pooled Mean Groups and Mean Groups estimations was used on U.S. state (including District of Columbia) specific data from 1987 to 2015 to calculate the long and short run results that would support an Environmental Kuznets Curve hypothesis. The panel of states was divided into low, medium, and high GDP brackets as disaggregate models and those were examined along with a model of the entire United States. Evidence for an Environmental Kuznets Curve for the United States could not be established in the aggregate model, however it was found that renewable energy consumption did have a negative coefficient, which indicates CO₂ emission mitigation through renewable energy consumption. Out of the individual renewable energy consumption variables tested, only wind energy consumption was found to be statistically significant while the model also exhibited evidence to support an Environmental Kuznets Curve hypothesis in this aggregate model. Looking at the different GDP state brackets, low GDP states were the only bracket that yielded evidence of an Environmental Kuznets Curve in the disaggregate models. For estimations with the low GDP states bracket looking at the individual renewable energy consumption variables, hydroelectric, biomass, solar, and wind energy consumption variables were statistically significant as well. The medium GDP bracket states aggregate model did not yield conclusive results, stemming from the lack of slope in the GDP variable for this model. Out of the individual renewable energy consumption variables tested in the subset, biomass was the only energy consumption to be statistically significant while the model exhibited evidence of an Environmental Kuznets Curve. The high GDP bracket aggregate model did not yield results showing evidence of an Environmental Kuznets Curve, while the individual renewable energy consumption variable subset models geothermal and wind energy consumption were statistically significant within models showing evidence of an Environmental Kuznets Curve. Breaking out these separate renewable energy consumption variables in an Environmental Kuznets Curve analysis can provide empirical support for policy and investment in specific renewable energy technology.
    • Assisting school personnel with youth transitioning from residential treatment to a school environment

      Smith, Kristi; Cook, Christine; McMorrow, Samantha; Gifford, Valerie (2015-12)
      The following research project examines the data and literature regarding youth who reside in residential treatment centers for behavior and mental health purposes. The paper introduces common risk factors that youth are experiencing which contribute to their placement in the facilities, as well as the difficulties they face upon exiting the treatment program. This project explores how schools can assist students in the transition from residential treatment to a school setting using a bio-ecological model that supports the students on an individual level up to a systemic level. School counselors serve as a key point of contact for transitioning students and can help teachers to understand this population and introduce supports both in the classroom and schoolwide. Teachers will also learn how to identify and modify potential negative stigmas, frustrations, and thought processes by practicing cognitive behavior techniques. The application resulting from the project is a counselor lead in-service for elementary through high school teachers, administrators, and student support services personnel.
    • Do you know Title IX: a sexual assault navigation tool for college students

      Napolski, Jamie; Koskey, Michael; Drew, Elaine; McGee, Sean; Ramos, Judith (2017-05)
      This paper presents a Master's Project in Cross-Cultural Studies at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) that sought to understand Alaska Native and first-year (freshman) students beliefs and behaviors about the Title IX process at UAF. Title IX is a federal law which states that no individual in the United States shall be discriminated or excluded from participation, denied the benefits or subject to discrimination, based on their sex, within any educational program or activity that receives Federal financial assistance. This project undertook a mixed-method study utilizing a survey and focus groups to identify what information students are being provided regarding Title IX, how much students understand regarding their rights and resources, and ultimately to develop a practical tool to improve students' understanding and navigation of the Title IX process. The results of the focus groups and surveys are presented and discussed. The tool includes an explanation of remedies and also where to locate resources here at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.
    • DUI courts: the need for standardized DUI court evaluations

      Cameron, Howard; May, Jeff; Boldt, Frank; Duke, J. Robert (2018-12)
      There have been numerous evaluations of driving under the influence (DUI) treatment courts. The evaluation process and tools vary widely. This research project reviewed seven individual courts' evaluations, including process evaluations and outcome evaluations to determine the strength of each court's evaluation. The research goal was to better understand how these courts are evaluated, the strength of those evaluation processes, and to determine what, if any, changes can and should be made to strengthen them. Presently, there are not any standardized evaluations tools for DUI treatment courts. This research concludes that evaluations should be standardized and such standardization will allow for a stronger evaluation and the ability to uniformly compare courts and court processes.
    • Examining the advocacy coalition framework for insight into shale gas development in US and UK political systems

      Wolfley, Kathryn (2014-12)
      The project considers the Advocacy Coalition Framework from the discipline of policymaking which is used to examine contentious and politically complex policy issues, particularly in energy and environmental development and planning. Shale gas development in the United States has been noted for its dramatic economic and political effects, leading some countries to pursue development of their own shale resources. The United Kingdom's tentative steps into the industry have engendered efforts to understand American experiences and conceptualize how their own country may or may not accommodate such development. The project attempts to highlight the current or potential issues or benefits entering the discourse and extrapolate insights from the Advocacy Coalition Framework to enhance and inform shale gas development as a social issue in addition to existing as an economic or technological disruption. Thoughts on attitudes between disciplines tangent to shale gas development are also expressed.
    • The future of shale

      Malin, Michael A.; Vander Naald, Brian P.; Little, John; Tichotsky, John; Reynolds, Douglas (2016-05)
      This project examines the various drivers that led to the U.S. shale oil revolution in order to predict its place in the energy industry going forward and to analyze its effects on Alaska. The shale boom flooded the market with oil causing a dramatic decrease in crude oil prices in late 2014. With this price drop threatening to send Alaska into an economic recession, the future of shale should be of primary concern to all Alaskans as well as other entities that rely heavily on oil revenue. The primary driver leading to the shale revolution is technology. Advances in hydraulic fracturing, horizontal drilling, and 3D seismic mapping made producing shale oil and gas possible for the first time. New technologies like rotary steerable systems and measurements while drilling continue to make shale production more efficient, and technology will likely continue to improve. Infrastructure helps to explain why the shale revolution was mostly an American phenomenon. Many countries with shale formations have political infrastructure too unstable to risk shale investment. Capital infrastructure is a primary strength of the U.S. and also helps to explain why shale development didn't find its way up to Alaska despite having political stability. Financial infrastructure allowed oil companies to receive the funding necessary to quickly bring shale to the market. The final driver explored is crude oil prices. High oil prices helped spark the shale revolution, but with the recent price crash, there is uncertainty about its future. With production costs continually falling due to technology improvements and analysts predicting crude oil prices to stabilize above most project breakeven points, the future of shale looks bright.
    • Grandparents, great parents: negotiating the role transition to custodial grandparent

      Burnett, Leanne Alaine (2012-05)
      An ever increasing number of grandparents in the United States are taking on the responsibility for providing primary care for their grandchildren. Focus group interviews conducted in two urban communities in Alaska were the basis of this study examining how grandparents negotiate the role transition as they become custodial grandparents. Role theory was used to inform the analysis of the data. The two major themes which emerged suggested these transitions were effected by role conflict and role timing. The grandparents participating in the study indicated that involvement in peer support groups helped them to more successfully negotiate this difficult role transition.
    • Helping veterans through outreach

      Ebersole, Rodney B.; Daku, Mike; Boldt, Frank; Duke, Rob (2017-12)
      The present Master's project seeks to develop a better understanding of Veterans and what they are going through. Research methods include extensive data on the high suicide rates of Veterans. Veteran and service members are in need of a service to them that will address the issue of suicide and what can be done to help and eliminate this problem. The programs that need to be designed to help needs should be in locations that have Veteran populations so as to serve them with their needs. Ultimately, Veterans Affairs (VA) officials have boosted their mental health personnel and suicide hotline staff in recent years, but at this time their data does not reflect it helping Veterans getting the help that they so desperately need.
    • Market impacts and global implications of U.S. shale development and hydraulic fracturing: an economic, engineering, and environmental perspective

      Umweke, Maduabuchi Pascal; Baek, Jungho; Patil, Shirish; Perkins, Robert; Reynolds, Douglas (2018-05)
      The United States oil industry is experiencing a revolution because of significant oil production from tight oil plays since the mid-2000s. Advancements in horizontal well drilling and hydraulic fracturing are powering this new chapter in oil development. Increased oil production has brought billions of dollars of new revenue to oil companies involved in tight oil exploration and production, new jobs in the oil industry, and more tax revenue to oil regions around the U.S. However, tight oil resources do not only exist in the U.S. An understanding of the U.S. tight oil development experience could bring value to stakeholders within and outside the United States, and provide lessons and templates applicable in other tight oil regions. This research examines the U.S. tight oil experience and draws lessons for aspiring tight oil regions on the engineering, economic, and environmental fronts. On the economic front, I have examined an autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) model on key oil industry macroeconomic data (West Texas Intermediate oil price, tight oil production, and rig count) from 2007 through 2016, and the impact of oil price on tight oil development for the Bakken, Eagle Ford, Niobrara, and Permian tight oil plays. The results show that oil companies in different plays react differently to oil price signals and do so in relation to oil field development characteristics. In addition, oil production and drilling intensity in the Eagle Ford play is found to be most responsive to oil price increases than the Permian, Bakken, or Niobrara oil plays. The Permian play was most resilient during the 2014 through 2016 oil price plunge. Oil production does not fall in response to a decrease in oil price, equally as it rises in response to oil price increase. Tight oil operators are quicker in bringing drilling rigs to service as prices rise than they take them away in response to falling oil prices, but do reduce drilling significantly in response to an oil price plunge. These results have significant ramifications for operators and assets in the respective oil plays or future plays with similar development characteristics. On the engineering front, I used petroleum engineering oil production forecasting Decline Curve Analysis techniques, the Drillinginfo Software, and historical development data of U.S. plays, to conduct oil production forecast for seven U.S. tight oil plays. Forecast results are shown to be comparable to forecasts by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Building on previous EIA geologic studies on non-U.S. tight oil plays, and by selecting best analogues from within U.S. tight oil plays, I have completed an economic assessment and uncertainty analysis for 10 non-U.S. tight plays using a simple fiscal tax regime. The results indicate that the Eagle Ford play in Mexico, the Vaca Muerta play in Argentina, and the Qingshankou play in China rank highest among the plays studied. Of oil price, royalty rate, discount rate, well cost, extraction tax, and recovery factor parameters evaluated, results indicate that oil price and well cost are among the biggest drivers of profitability in these plays. On the environmental front, I conducted case studies on the busiest U.S. tight oil plays (Bakken and Eagle Ford) and examined the impact of tight oil development on the environment. Local solutions to environmental challenges alongside environmental regulations are discussed and presented as possible templates for other aspiring plays. Since securing freshwater sources alongside wastewater management emerge as major issues in tight oil development, a cost comparison is conducted for reused water disposal versus one-use water disposal options, for a hypothetical development. Results indicate that on a cost-per-well basis, the reduction in water disposal volume from subsurface frack flowback retention improves water reuse economics; the water reuse option is preferable to one-use water disposal for U.S. oil plays. This result points to potential cost savings for reused water disposal in regions such as the Bakken with few disposal wells.
    • Meeting the bereavement needs of older adults with cognitive challenges

      Glendinning, Terry; Renes, Susan; Dahl, Heather; McMorrow, Samantha (2017-06)
      Approximately 5.5 million people in the United States are living with cognitive challenges such as Alzheimer's and other dementias. People with cognitive challenges, following the death of a loved one, often experience unacknowledged grief. This paper first describes grief as it occurs in older adults who are not cognitively challenged. This is followed by a review of literature focusing on the grief of older adults with cognitive challenges. The project looks at methods for accommodating the cognitive and communication needs of this population as they work through their grief process.
    • Misseri

      Aubuchon, David; Farmer, Daryl; Soos, Frank; Schell, Jen (2020-05)
      The nine stories in Misseri deal with the following themes: poverty, childhood abuse, sexism, and racism. These are the most obvious destructive components of what I will refer to as white trash culture. This thesis strives to honestly depict characters who have grown into adulthood in a white trash culture, regardless of whether they are white or male. The characters of these stories wrestle with destructive acts they have performed (or feel the impulse to perform), destructive acts they have witnessed, and destructive acts they have fallen victim to. Characters struggle for the self-awareness needed to give their actions agency: actions that follow a character's own sense of morals, rather than actions that are merely learned responses. The stories of Misseri are ordered by protagonists in the following way: from least selfaware male to most self-aware male, then from least self-aware female to most self-aware female. The collection starts with five first-person male narrators, hinges on a third-person omniscient narrator, and ends with three first-person female narrators. Half of the first-person stories are written from a close past-tense perspective. These narrators may not yet have the reflective distance or skills to contextualize and understand and respond to the story's events in helpful ways. The other half of the first-person stories are written with a present tense reflective voice. These present tense narrators recontextualize, explain, and often depart from their past perspective and past actions. These narrators model the act of learning from the past. It is my hope that the escalation of reflection and self-awareness throughout the collection can not only better contextualize the lives of white trash people but also show the progression one must often take to move away from socialized actions and reactions and toward agency, even if few of the characters perform monumental acts.
    • Police culture: does culture prevent proper policing?

      McGuffin, Michael; Duke, J. Robert; May, Jeff; Boldt, Frank (2018)
      This project is about identifying the key issues that police officers face in today's society. There is an emphasis on community policing and to adjust police training to account for the strong pull of the police subculture. The main purpose of this project is to strengthen the bonds between the police and the community and changing how officers approach their interactions within the community. The end goal is to alleviate community concerns that police officers are out to get them while also alleviating the concerns officers have that the community hates them. This project will attempt to quell those concerns while proposing a solution that benefits both officers, the police department, and the community.
    • A school-based group counseling cirriculum for adolescent girls experiencing low self-esteem

      Doolittle, Amanda; Renes, Susan; McMorrow, Samantha; Dahl, Heather (2017-05)
      This project reviews the existing literature on adolescent development in females, and demonstrates the importance of school counselors facilitating small group counseling with students who experience low self-esteem. Although research suggests social-emotional development begins in childhood, and the American School Counselor Association requires a social-emotional component to school counseling programs, there are few resources available to secondary school counselors who see a need for an effective group counseling curriculum for females with low self-esteem. This project aims to provide secondary school counselors with such a curriculum.
    • Self Silencing in Children and Adolescents

      Walz, Gena L. (1998-05)
      Self silencing is the theorized tendency to abnormally suppress expression of one’s own needs for the sake of a significant relationship Thought to be a predominately female behavior, self silencing has mainly been empirically studied in adults and has been associated with depression in women. To determine the extent, the approximate age of onset and the gender distribution of self silencing behavior in boys and girls, the Silencing the Self Scale (STSS) (Jack & Dill, 1992) was administered to twelfth grade students, and a modified version of this scale for children (STSS-C) was developed, tested and administered to fourth, eighth, and twelfth grade students. No significant differences in self silencing were observed between genders at any grade level. However significant age related differences in self silencing behavior were demonstrated in both boys and girls. In addition, these age related patterns differed significantly between boys and girls.
    • Sense of place in military children's new community and school environment

      Imhoff, Myriam C.; Green, Carie; Vinlove, Amy; Kardash, Diane (2017-12)
      Relocation, or permanent change of station (PCS) is one of the constants of the military lifestyle. Thus, every two to three years, dependent children of enlisted military are uprooted from a place and forced to call a new place home. The goal of this research project is to provide a resource for teachers who have transient military children in their classroom and help them develop a sense of place in their new community and school environment. Scholarly literature on geographic mobility, stress and coping, education, sense of place, and place attachment as well as existing educational resources for military families inform the scope of this curriculum project. Research reports that having deployed parents as well as relocating have a negative impact on military adolescents' education and social life. However, the resources given for military parents or for teachers getting new military students are limited or difficult to find. This written project, accompanied by a web-based resource, conglomerates ideas from several sources as well as new ideas to help teachers ease military children's transition. Lessons focus on reading, writing, social studies, and art. Key classroom components are also suggested; these include Google annotated map, bulletin board or map in the classroom, bulletin board with photos of the environment/community, guest book for the classroom, and getting to know each other activity. Additionally, curriculum is aligned with Alaska State standards for third through fifth grade.
    • Socioeconomic factors that lead to Latino male students leaving school before graduating

      D'Agostino, Joseph C.; Wong, Nga-Wing Anjela; Barnhardt, Raymond; Armstrong, Anne Brenner (2012-05)
      Students of color make up a predominant number of learners that leave high school before graduating (National Center for Education Research, 2009). I selected to study Latino males to narrow the scope of my research. The literature I reviewed pointed directly at socioeconomics as one of the primary factors. I feel there are more specific factors involved for many of the individuals impacted. I used a qualitative approach and utilized an anonymous survey and individual interviews to pinpoint some of these factors. The findings from my research further supported that socioeconomics were a leading factor. My data and literature review showed that school environment and stereotyping/discrimination also played a role. I intend to conduct further research to identify the additional sub-factors that are most prevalent to Latino males. My long-term goal is to provide information to my peers that can assist in the construction or reconstruction of programs that can offer the best support for these students.
    • Strategies for Chinese international students to overcome the challenges of studying in the United States

      Chen, Yuerong; Simpson, Joni; McMorrow, Samantha; Renes, Susan L. (2015)
      Using current research and literature, this project discusses the challenges that Chinese international students may have while they experience cultural adjustment in the United States. In addition, this project also examines strategies for Chinese international students to smooth the cultural transition during their stay in the United States. There is research about Chinese immigrants' cultural transition and international students' transitional periods. However, there is a very limited amount of research specifically on Chinese international students' cultural adjustment in the United States. Educating the Chinese international students, educators and counselors in international institutions about the challenges of cultural transition and the strategies to overcome the challenges may potentially help these students when they arrive in the United States. The application of this project is a presentation to international office personnel, counselors who work at university counseling centers and faculty members who have a large population of Chinese international students in their classrooms. The project also offers recommendations for any professionals who work to help Chinese international students to succeed in their study in a new educational system and a new culture.
    • Strengths-based analysis of student success in online courses

      Gering, Carol; Sheppard, Dani'; Morotti, Allan; Adams, Barbara; Renes, Susan (2017-08)
      The purpose of this research was to increase understanding of post-secondary student success in online courses by evaluating a contextually rich combination of personal, circumstantial, and course variables. A strengths-based perspective framed the investigation. Mixed-method data were collected and analyzed sequentially in three phases: two phases of quantitative collection and analysis were followed by qualitative interviews and comprehensive analysis. The study first used logistic regression to analyze existing data on more than 27,000 student enrollments, spanning a time period of four academic years. The second phase of research enhanced the modeling focused on a subset of the total population; students from a single semester were invited to complete an assessment of non-cognitive attributes and personal perceptions. Between the two phases, 28 discreet variables were analyzed. Results suggest that different combinations of variables may be effective in predicting success among students with varying levels of educational experience. This research produced preliminary predictive models for student success at each level of class standing. The study concluded with qualitative interviews designed to explain quantitative results more fully. Aligned with a strengths-based perspective, 12 successful students were asked to elaborate on factors impacting their success. Themes that emerged from the interviews were congruent with quantitative findings, providing practical examples of student and instructor actions that contribute to online student success.