• Effects of methylmercury and theaflavin digallate on adipokines in mature 3t3-l1 adipocytes

      Chauhan, Shubhangi; Duffy, Lawrence; Drew, Kelly; Dunlap, Kriya (2019-05)
      Diabetes is a contributor to morbidity across the globe and is often associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome and other inflammatory diseases associated with aging. In addition to genetic and lifestyle factors, environmental factors such as metals and persistent organic pollutants may increase the severity or lower the threshold of these conditions. In cell culture, methylmercury is toxic to adipocytes and may impact the adipokine secretions. In this study, I determined the effects of different concentrations of theaflavin digallate on methylmercury exposed 3T3-L1 adipocytes in cell culture. Secretions of resistin, adiponectin and lipid peroxidation product, 4-HNE were monitored using ELISA assays from Day 18 to 28. Cell morphology was assessed over the period of ten days and on day 28 was observed using Lipid (Oil Red O) staining. Results showed that exposure to methylmercury increased the levels of resistin and adiponectin as well as 4-HNE when compared to the control cells. Methylmercury treated cells resulted in smaller and highly clumped lipid droplets. These results suggest that methylmercury induces reactive oxygen species leading to development of an inflammatory response. Theaflavin digallate reduced the impact of methylmercury by restoring the morphology and secretion patterns of adiponectin, resistin and 4-HNE. With this enhanced signaling model other anti-inflammatory agents could be tested at this biochemical level eventually leading to studies in animal models.