• Examination of saffron cod (Eleginus gracilis) population genetic structure

      Smé, Noël A.; Gharrett, Anthony; Mueter, Franz; Heifetz, Jonathan (2019-05)
      The Saffron Cod (Eleginus gracilis) is an abundant forage fish that inhabits the coastlines of the north Pacific and Arctic oceans. We examined Saffron Cod population genetic structure to provide a reference baseline in anticipation of human and climate-change alterations of the Arctic environment. Nine microsatellites were designed to describe the genetic compositions of and variation among 40 collections of Saffron Cod from four regions (northwestern Alaska, Gulf of Alaska, Sea of Okhotsk, and Gulf of Anadyr). The northwestern Alaska collections (Bering Sea, Norton Sound, and Chukchi Sea) exhibited little genetic divergence. The Gulf of Anadyr collection differed from other regions but was most similar to those of the northwestern Alaska region. The two collections within the Sea of Okhotsk (Sakhalin Island and Hokkaido Island) differed genetically, but not to the extent they did from other regions. The collections from the Gulf of Alaska (Kodiak Island and Prince William Sound) comprised a lineage that was distinct from all of the other collections, including the geographically adjacent northwestern Alaska collections. The absence of genetic structure among northwestern Alaska collections probably reflects their recent expansion into previously unavailable habitat that became available after the Last Glacial Maximum (~16,000 years ago). The divergence of the Gulf of Alaska lineage may have resulted from recurrent episodes of isolation from previous glaciations.
    • Genetic diversity and population genetic structure of tanner crab Chionoecetes bairdi in Alaskan waters

      Johnson, Genevieve M.; López, J. Andrés; Eckert, Ginny L.; Hardy, Sarah M. (2019-05)
      Tanner crab (Chionoecetes bairdi) is a large-bodied species of crab harvested in commercial, personal use, and subsistence fisheries across Alaska. The commercial fisheries were highly productive until the 1980s, when most stocks faced major declines and were closed to harvest. The recovery success of stocks throughout the state has been variable throughout the subsequent decades, leading managers to question whether there are aspects of the population dynamics that are not accounted for. There is limited information on the genetic population structure of C. bairdi in Alaskan waters, which has caused uncertainty about whether established management areas align well with distribution and migration patterns for this species. I applied novel high throughput sequencing methods to measure genetic diversity and investigate the genetic population structure of C. bairdi in Alaskan waters. Genomic DNA was isolated from samples collected from Southeast Alaska, Prince William Sound, and the Eastern Bering Sea, both east and west of 166°W longitude, and processed according to a Double-Digest Restriction-Associated DNA Sequencing protocol. The final genotype assembly included 89 individuals that were genotyped at 2,740 independent, neutral single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites, and contained 3.06% missing data. The average observed heterozygosity across SNP sites within regions was significantly lower than the average heterozygosity expected for populations in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. An analysis of molecular variance indicated that genetic variability was mostly found within individuals (90%), 10% of variability was observed between individuals within sampling regions, and no significant amount of variation was detected between sampling regions. Furthermore, pairwise FST estimates between sampling regions were low, and thus the null model of panmixia could not be rejected. Principal components analysis was also congruent with a model of no differentiation among regions. Bayesian analysis implemented in the program STRUCTURE did not support any population partitioning above K = 1 clusters, again indicating that there is not substantial genetic differentiation among the regions sampled from across the state of Alaska. These results indicate high gene flow throughout the distribution of Tanner crab across the Alaska continental shelf. Recognized stocks are genetically indistinguishable from each other. This may indicate that stocks exchange a substantial number of migrants, and may not operate independently. This new information can provide insights as management plans are evaluated and refined.
    • Harmothoe imbricata: species complex or complex species?

      Gastaldi, Angela; Lopez, J. Andres; Hardy, Sarah; Kelley, Amanda; Sikes, Derek (2019-05)
      Accurate estimates of species diversity are constrained by cryptic species complexes, in which multiple closely related species are grouped under a single species name due to the absence of clear morphological differences. Cryptic diversity is known to be prevalent in polychaete worms, a mostly marine group commonly known as bristle worms. A recent survey of polychaete diversity discovered that the widespread scale-worm Harmothoe imbricata comprises multiple distinct mitochondrial lineages based on analysis of the Cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene, which is often referred to as the 'barcoding' gene. Analyses based solely on DNA sequences from COI may overestimate the number of lineages comprising a cryptic species complex, so it has been recommended that cryptic species investigations incorporate nuclear gene sequences. The goal of this study was to determine whether the incorporation of DNA sequences from the nuclear genome corroborates the designation of H. imbricata as a cryptic species complex. I sequenced segments of COI and five nuclear genes: ITS1, ITS2, H3, and portions of the 18S and 28S genes of H. imbricata and analyzed them using distance measures, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference. I compared phylogenetic trees produced from mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences, as well as from a combined mitochondrial/nuclear dataset. Harmothoe imbricata was found to include five mitochondrial lineages, whereas the nuclear sequences only supported four well-defined lineages. These results corroborate previous reports showing COIbased cryptic species investigations find more lineages than nuclear DNA based investigations. These results provide additional lines of evidence that H. imbricata is a cryptic species complex. These divergent lineages likely arose after being separated during the last glacial maximum but they are now found in sympatry. A thorough morphological study of H. imbricata populations may reveal phenotypic differences correlated with the genetic lineages identified here.
    • Impacts of a top predator (Esox lucius) on salmonids in Southcentral Alaska: genetics, connectivity, and vulnerability

      Jalbert, Chase S.; Falke, Jeffrey; Westley, Peter; López, J. Andrés; Dunker, Kristine (2018-12)
      Worldwide invasion and range expansion of northern pike (pike; Esox lucius) have been linked to the decline of native fishes and new techniques are needed to assess the effects of invasion over broad geographic scales. In Alaska, pike are native north and west of the Alaska Mountain Range but were introduced into Southcentral Alaska in the 1950s and again in the 1970s. To investigate the history of the invasion into Southcentral Alaska, I identified 7,889 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from three native and seven introduced populations in Alaska and examined genetic diversity, structure, and affinities of native and invasive pike. Pike exhibited low genetic variability in native populations (mean heterozygosity = 0.0360 and mean π = 0.000241) and further reductions in introduced populations (mean heterozygosity = 0.0227 and mean π = 0.000131), which suggests a bottleneck following introduction. Population differentiation was high among some populations (global FST = 0.424; max FST = 0.668) when compared to other freshwater fishes. I identified five genetically distinct clusters of populations, consisting of three native groups, a single Susitna River basin invasive group, and a Kenai Peninsula group, with little evidence of admixture among groups. The extremely reduced genetic diversity observed in invasive northern pike populations does not appear to affect their invasion success as the species range Southcentral Alaska continues to expand. To assess the vulnerability of five species of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) to the invasion, I combined intrinsic potential habitat modeling, connectivity estimates, and Bayesian networks across 22,875km of stream reaches in the Matanuska-Susitna basin, Alaska, USA. Pink salmon were the most vulnerable species, with 15.2% (2,458 km) of their range identified as "highly" vulnerable. They were followed closely by chum salmon (14.8%) and coho salmon (14.7%). Finally, analysis of the intersection of vulnerable salmon habitats revealed 1,001 km of streams that were highly vulnerable for all five Pacific salmon. This framework is easy to implement, adaptable to any species or region, and cost effective. With increasing threats of species introductions, fishery managers need new tools like those described here to efficiently identify critical areas shared by multiple species, where management actions can have the greatest impact.
    • Shining light on hibernator genomes: using radiation to reveal DNA damage and repair dynamics in Arctic ground squirrels

      Yancey, Krysta L.; Podlutsky, Andrej; Drew, Kelly; Harris, Michael (2018-12)
      Mammalian hibernation is characterized by dynamic changes in metabolism and body temperature; it may be sustained for up to nine months in some species. The majority of hibernation is spent in torpor, a dormant state, which is regularly interrupted by brief periods of activity referred to as interbout arousal. Upon arousal thermogenesis begins in vascularized fat and ends with whole-body shivering until the animal reaches a body temperature around 36-37 °C. Interbout arousal is usually less than a day long and is commonly thought to be necessary for maintenance and repair of tissues, in addition to the cycling and replenishment of metabolites. While physiologically extreme, torpor-arousal cycles do not drastically impact the health of hibernators. Rather, hibernators are recognized for their longevity and resistance to a variety of stresses, such as ischemia/reperfusion and the brain damage that typically follows. It remains unknown how the process of hibernation challenges genome stability and the basic molecular mechanisms of DNA repair. Therefore, this thesis begins with a review on current knowledge of genome maintenance in the context of mammalian hibernation, distinguishing it from other similar and often correlated conditions like hypothermia. Then, we present the first cellular and molecular study to be conducted on DNA damage and repair dynamics in a hibernator using the Alaskan arctic ground squirrel. Our results indicate that hibernators can avoid genome instability during torpor-arousal cycles through status-specific combinations of strategies for preventing DNA damage and efficient DNA repair, paired with anti-apoptotic environments. The unique suite of adaptations necessary to endure torpor-arousal cycles may help explain the longevity and radio-resistance that are often observed in hibernating species.