• 1977 Continuation Proposal

      Brown, Jerry (National Science Foundation, 1976-06)
    • 2005 Potato Variety Trials in the Matanuska Valley, Alaska

      Smeenk, J.; Leiner, R.; Terry, G. (Alaska Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2006-06)
      Twenty-two potato varieties were grown under irrigation at the AFES Palmer Research and Extension Center. The trial contained red, white, and russet-skinned varieties. The late-season rains provided ideal conditions for late blight (Phytopthora infestans), which appeared in the Matanuska Valley in mid August. Late blight affected the tubers leading to a reduction in marketable potatoes in many varieties.
    • 2020 Alaska Seismicity Summary

      Ruppert, Natalia A.; Gardine, Lea (2021-02)
      The Alaska Earthquake Center reported about 49,250 seismic events in Alaska and neighboring regions in 2020. The largest earthquake was a magnitude 7.8 event that occurred on July 22 in the Shumagin Islands region. It was followed by about 6,000 aftershocks including a magnitude 7.6 event on October 19. Other active spots include the 2018 M7.1 Anchorage, 2018 M6.4 Kaktovik, 2018 M7.9 Offshore Kodiak aftershock sequences, Purcell Mountains earthquake swarm, and Wright Glacier cluster northeast of Juneau.
    • The Agricultural Outlook: 1965

      Marsh, C.F.; Burton, W.E.; Saunders, A.D. (Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Alaska, 1965-03)
      The general economic picture for 1965 indicates another better-than average year for the nation as a whole. Strong advances in economic activity now underway will likely continue at least through the first half of the year. Current trends reveal no serious imbalances in the economy. Forces expected to shape demand expansion for business, consumers and the government in coming months are (1) continued uptrend in business investments, (2) favorable inventory-sales ratios, (3) further improvement in the goods and services export-import trade balance, (4) more favorable factors affecting demand for housing, schools, and facilities, (5) expanded consumer purchases of goods and services, (6) another big sales year for autos, (7) larger consumer expenditures for food, and (8) increased government purchases of goods and services.
    • Agronomic Crops Developed in Alaska

      Van Veldhuizen, Bob M.; Zhang, Mingchu; Knight, Charles W. (University of Alaska Fairbanks. Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 2014)
    • Air Force Contract No. AF 19(604)-1089

      Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska, 1954
      This report briefly describes the progress made at the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska during the past three months, in the study of arctic radio wave propagation under the Air Force Contract No. AF 19(604)-1089.
    • Air Transport of Alaskan Reindeer Applied Reindeer Research Project

      Dieterich, Robert A. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1989-12)
      This report describes one aspect of successful air transport developed over the past 20 years in Alaska
    • ALASKA 114 a tough-skinned main crop potato

      Dearborn, C.H. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1959-09)
      Alaska 114 was formally released to the Alaska Certified Seed G rowers Association in 1954 although it had been field tested by a few members during the preceding year. The selection was made from seedlings derived from a cross of Cobbler x Minnesota 13-1.
    • Alaska Agricultural Directory

      Lampard, Pete (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, Alaska Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, Soil Conservation Service, 1957-06)
      The Farm Directory has been assembled through the cooperation of the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, the Alaska Department of Agriculture, the Extension Service,s and the Soil Conservation Service. The Directory includes the various agencies who work with farmers, their addresses and staffs in addition to the names, addresses, and other pertinent information concerning farmers in the territory. The Directory will be of interest and benefit to farmers and various agencies and individuals working with the farmers and farming in Alaska.
    • ALASKA AGRICULTURAL TOURS: Chena Hot Springs Road

      Lewis, Carol E.; Pearson, Roger W. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1992-12)
      Entrance to the Chena Hot Springs Road is only 5 miles from downtown Fairbanks. The road provides an excellent opportunity to see an example o f the diversity of agricultural production in the Tanana Valley.
    • Alaska Berries

      Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2009
    • Alaska Crop Improvement Association: Seed Certification Hand Book

      Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Alaska Extension Service, 1956
      This bulletin brings together information on certified seed production in Alaska, It is hoped that it will acquaint Alaskans with the aims of a certified seed program and the work of the Alaska Crop Improvement Association in accomplishing those aims. It is a reference to the current rules for the production of certified seed and is issued in loose-leaf form to facilitate revision as changes occur.
    • Alaska Department of Fish and Game Reports

      Alaska Department of Fish and Game, 1964-12
      Reports from various Divisions within Alaska Department of Fish and Game
    • Alaska Earthquake Center Quarterly Technical Report April-June 2021

      Ruppert, Natalia (2021-08)
      This series of technical quarterly reports from the Alaska Earthquake Center (AEC) includes detailed summaries and updates on Alaska seismicity, the AEC seismic network and stations, field work, our social media presence, and lists publications and presentations by AEC staff. Multiple AEC staff members contributed to this report. It is issued in the following month after the completion of each quarter Q1: January-March, Q2: April-June, Q3: July-September, and Q4: October-December.
    • Alaska Earthquake Center Quarterly Technical Report January-March 2021

      Ruppert, Natalia (2021-05)
      This is the first in a series of technical quarterly reports from the Alaska Earthquake Center (AEC). It includes detailed summaries and updates on Alaska seismicity, the AEC seismic network and stations, field work, our social media presence, and lists publications and presentations by AEC staff. Multiple AEC staff members contributed to this report. It is issued in the following month after the completion of each quarter Q1: January-March, Q2: April-June, Q3: July-September, and Q4: October-December.
    • Alaska Earthquake Center Quarterly Technical Report July-September 2021

      Ruppert, Natalia (2021-11)
      This series of technical quarterly reports from the Alaska Earthquake Center (AEC) includes detailed summaries and updates on Alaska seismicity, the AEC seismic network and stations, field work, our social media presence, and lists publications and presentations by AEC staff. Multiple AEC staff members contributed to this report. It is issued in the following month after the completion of each quarter Q1: January-March, Q2: April-June, Q3: July-September, and Q4: October-December.
    • Alaska Earthquake Center: A 2020 Perspective

      Grassi, Beth; West, Michael; Gardine, Lea (2021-03)
      The Alaska Earthquake Center is not historically in the habit of producing annual reports. We are in a dynamic time, however. Societally-significant earthquakes and multiple tsunami concerns over the past few years have brought more attention to what we do. At the same time, we are experiencing significant growth in several areas. Our goal in distributing this summary is to communicate the breadth of our activities and the diversity of our stakeholders, helping us become even more effective at meeting the earthquake and tsunami science needs of Alaska and the nation.
    • Alaska Farms: Organization and Practices in 1949

      Moore, Clarence A. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1951-03)
      This is the second of a series of annual studies being conducted to determine the types of farm organization and farm practices consistent with a stable and profitable farm economy, Detailed records of organization and operations in 1949 were taken from cooperating growers in the Matanuska Valley and in the Fairbanks area of the Tanana Valley. Information was secured on the extent of farming in the Anchorage area and on the Kenai peninsula.
    • ALASKA FOOD PRICE PATTERNS

      Thomas, Monica E. (Agricultural Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska, 1976-09)
      Prices and costs of living in Alaska have been reviewed in earlier works by this author and others (1) ; until now, however, there has not been detailed analyses of trends in food prices, despite the need for this information . Food comprises a large portion of the consumer budget; this is particularly significant in the lower income brackets. Alaska presently imports the majority of its foodstuffs, making Alaska food prices dependent on m any circumstances, some beyond state influence. Concurrently, Alaska's potential for large scale agricultural production is being discussed and recognized (2). This paper has three primary objectives: (1) to discuss the level of retail food prices in Anchorage relative to the U.S. (2) to describe trends in retail food prices, both in Anchorage and the U.S. ( 3) to present retail food price comparisons among selected communities within Alaska.