• Alaska Heat: wildland fire research and management issues

      Fitzgerald, Doreen (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2005)
    • ALASKA HOT DOGS: OUR DOGS ARE TOP DOGS

      Lewis, Carol E.; Geier, Hans (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1999-10)
      Sausages, one of the oldest forms of processed food, are a means of using and preserving animal trimmings. The hot dog is a specialized sausage. It originated in Germany where it was named “dachshund” sausage because it looked like the popular badger (dachs) hound (hund). The U.S. hot dog originated at the Polo Grounds in New York. Vendors hawked dachshund sausages in buns while a sports cartoonist sketched a barking dachshund nestled warmly in a bun. He labeled the cartoon “hot dog”. Today the hot dog enjoys popularity throughout the world.
    • Alaska Marine Highway Systems Analysis

      Metz, Paul; Taylor, Mark; Brigham, Tom; Larocque, Shephane; Pierce, Jana; Arledge, Ashleigh; Calvin, Jim; Harrington, Erin; Miller, Scott; Lingwood, Bob; et al. (Alaska University Transportation Center, 2011)
    • Alaska Regional Climate Projections

      Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2009
    • Alaska Road Weather Project | Technical Performance Assessment Report | Fairbanks Field Demonstration 2013-2014

      Chapman, Mike; Linden, Seth; Burghardt, Crystal (Alaska University Transportation Center, Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities, 2014)
    • Alaska University Transportation Center 2007 Annual Report

      Alaska University Transportation Center; University of Alaska Fairbanks (Alaska University Transportation Center, 2007)
    • Alaska University Transportation Center 2008 Annual Report

      Alaska University Transportation Center; University of Alaska Fairbanks (Alaska University Transportation Center, 2008)
    • Alaska University Transportation Center 2009 Annual Report

      Alaska University Transportation Center; University of Alaska Fairbanks (Alaska University Transportation Center, 2009)
    • Alaska University Transportation Center 2010 Annual Report

      Alaska University Transportation Center; University of Alaska Fairbanks (Alaska University Transportation Center, 2010)
    • Alaska University Transportation Center 2011 Annual Report

      Alaska University Transportation Center; University of Alaska Fairbanks (Alaska University Transportation Center, 2011)
    • Alaska University Transportation Center 2012 Annual Report

      Alaska University Transportation Center; University of Alaska Fairbanks (Alaska University Transportation Center, 2012)
    • Alaska University Transportation Center 2013 Annual Report

      Alaska University Transportation Center; University of Alaska Fairbanks (Alaska University Transportation Center, 2013)
    • Alaska's Farm & Consumer Resources: 1963

      Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Alaska, 1963
    • Alaska's Farm & Consumer Resources: 1964

      Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Alaska, 1965-01
    • Alaska's international interests in fish and game

      Kirkness, Walter (Alaska Department of Fish and Game, 1964)
    • ALASKAN WILDLIFE DISEASES

      Dieterich, Robert A. (Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, 1981)
      The expertise of the writers of Alaskan Wildlife Diseases covers a broad area of science including veterinary medicine, bacteriology, virology, parasitology, physiology, biochemistry and pathology. They each gave freely their time with out compensation because of a basic desire to share their knowledge, observations and experiences. These writers are all professional wildlife disease investigators who have worked in Alaska. Their dealings with wildlife in Alaska total more than 70 years of experience. Hopefully, this joint effort will serve to bring people in this area of interest together so that they may each express their opinions and receive comments in a continuing effort to share and expand knowledge of wildlife disease.
    • Alaska’s Reindeer Program 1986 Report of the University of Alaska Reindeer Program: 1986 Report the Applied Reindeer Research Project

      Epps, Alan C. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management University of Alaska-Fairbanks, 1987-07)
      The University o f Alaska-Fairbanks reindeer program has existed under its current organizational framework since 1981. Program guidance across the three functions o f research, extension, and instruction continues to meet with support both internal and external to the university. The program ’s user group, the Alaska Reindeer Herders Association, is an ideal Land Grant/Sea Grant recipient for such guidance. Several major issues outlined by the Reindeer Herders Association’s first five-year plan have been addressed during the past few years. In most cases the university’s input has helped to resolve the association’s concerns. Currently a new five-year plan is being developed, and the university’s reindeer program is responding by redirecting its efforts toward emerging issues. This report identifies recent accomplishments in the reindeer program , continuing efforts, and projected areas of future effort.
    • Alaskland Red Clover

      Hodgson, H.J.; Wilder, William B.; Osguthorpe, John E. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1953-02)
      Since fanning in Alaska first began and especially since dairy farming became the primary agricultural industry, there has existed a need for hardy legumes which would survive Alaska winters and produce satisfactory yields of high quality forage. To meet this need hundreds of legume species and strains have been introduced during the past 40 or more years. Almost all have lacked the necessary hardiness or have not been satisfactory agronomically. The release of Alaskland red clover in the spring of 1953 is the first time a hardy legume has been made available to growers in Alaska.
    • Alternative Grain and Oilseed Crops for Interior Alaska

      Knight, C.W. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1994-02)
      Barley is the principal grain crop in Interior Alaska. Oats are second in importance but are often harvested for hay rather than grain. Due to the short growing season (83–100 frost-free days), options for alternative crops are limited and producers have little opportunity to rotate crops for weed and disease control or to switch crops as prices fluctuate. Wheat, triticale, buckwheat, canola, flax, sunflowers, meadowfoam, faba beans, and field peas have all been grown on a small scale in Alaska. However, little information is available on the climatic, nutrient, or cultural requirements, the probability of a successful harvest, the quality of the harvested product, or the potential markets for these crops. This study was initiated in 1993 to evaluate several niche crops for Interior Alaska.
    • Analysis of Alaska Transportation Sectors to Assess Energy Use and Impacts of Price Shocks and Climate Change Legislation

      Fay, Ginny; Schwörer, Tobias; Guettabi, Mouhcine; Armagost, Jeffrey (Alaska University Transportation Center, UAA Institute of Social and Economic Research, 2013)