• Rural Alaska Electric Power Quality

      Aspnes, J.D. (1984-03)
      Poor quality electric power has traditionally been blamed for electrical and electronic equipment malfunctions and failures in rural Alaskan communities. This report presents results of a recently completed project in which power system disturbance analyzers provide the first comprehensive power quality data from Alaskan villages. Power systems of four widely separated communities were studied for a total of 1,010 days. These results are important because of the trend in rural Alaska toward more sophisticated equipment that is sensitive to power system disturbances. These data represent a first step in developing appropriate countermeasures to protect electrical systems connected to isolated rural 60 Hz power generator facilities
    • Rural Facility Electric Power Quality Analysis

      Aspnes, J.D.; Zhao, Y. Q.; Spell, B.D.; Merrit, R.P. (1991-03)
      This report gives results of a recently completed data collection and analysis project investigating electric power quality of two isolated utility systems in Alaska. This is the second phase of a similar effort reported in 1984 which provided the first comprehensive power quality data from four small Alaskan communities. In this report, second generation instrumentation is described and comprehensive data and data analyses are presented. These data are important because of the increased use throughout Alaska of electrical and electronic equipment that may be damage by power system disturbances.
    • Rural Facility Electric Power Quality Enhancement

      Wilson, M.; Aspnes, J.D.; Merritt, R.P.; Spell, B.D. (1991-05)
      Electric power disturbances are known to be more prevalent in small, isolated power systems than in larger interconnected grids which service most of the United States. This fact has given rise to a growing concern about the relative merits of different types of power conditioning equipment and their effectiveness in protecting sensitive electronics and essential loads in rural Alaska. A study has been conducted which compares isolation transformers, voltage regulators, power conditioners, uninterruptible power supplies and indoor computer surge suppressors in their ability to suppress the various disturbances which have been measured in several Alaskan communities. These include voltage sags and surges, impulses, blackouts, frequency variations and long-term voltage abnormalities. In addition, the devices were also subjected to fast, high-magnitude impulses such as might be expected in the event of a lightning strike to or near utility distribution equipment. The solutions for power line problems will vary for different load applications and for different rural electrical environments. The information presented in this report should prove to be valuable in making the analysis.