• Alaska Water Resources Research Needs for the 70's: A seminar, Oct. 27-28 Anchorage, Alaska

      Carlson, Robert F.; Butler, Jacqueline (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1973-09)
    • An Atmospheric carbon monoxide transport model for Fairbanks, Alaska

      Carlson, Robert F.; Fox, John (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1976-06)
      A comprehensive computer model of atmospheric carbon monoxide transport has been developed for Fairbanks, Alaska. The model, based on a finite element method computational scheme, accents input from specified vehicle traffic parameters inc1uding miles per day, number of cold starts, and total idle time. The carbon monoxide concentrations are calculated for specified time intervals at numerous points throughout the urban area. A test of the model against the data of January 22, 1975, indicates a good correspondence. Extremely high carbon monoxide concentration were calculated at an unmeasured point down wind of the business district. The model should prove useful for a number of community needs including parking management, planning and zoning, episode strategy planning, and carbon monoxide forecasting.
    • Bibliography of Arctic Water Resources

      Hartman, Charles W.; Carlson, Robert F. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1970-11)
      In July, 1969, the Institute of Water Resources began a study of Alaska's Arctic water resources in response to the impending resource development of Arctic regions. The intent of the study was to provide a literature review of existing information, a model study of the water system in an Arctic region, and a limited field program. It became quite apparent early in the study that a great amount of literature pertaining to the Arctic water cycle was available and would need extensive organization to be useful. It also became apparent that if the literature were organized, the list would be useful to investigators other than ourselves. The result is this Bibliography of Arctic Water Resources.
    • A Catalog of Hydroclimatological Data for Alaska's Coastal Zone

      Carlson, Robert F.; Weller, Gunter (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1972-05)
      In order to perceive a better understanding of the interrelationships of the coastal zone water we proposed a research project which was to sort out many of the complex variables. The project was not begun due to the lack of sufficient funds. We did, however, begin a limited literature search and listing of hydroclimatological data sources of Alaska's coastal zone. We felt this would be a modest but useful start towards the larger study. It should also have some practical usefulness to others. This data catalog is a result of this initial study. Because of the wide variety of types of agency which collect data and the literally hundreds of sources through which they are reported, it is often quite bewildering for even experienced investigators to sort out what can be found and where. Although we are sure that the catalog is far from complete, we feel that it is a useful beginning towards an attempt to better understand the hydroclimatological processes in Alaska's coastal zone. We wish to invite contributions and criticisms which could lead to an improved and more comprehensive version at some future date.
    • A Computer Model of the Tidal Phenomena in Cook Inlet, Alaska

      Carlson, Robert F.; Behlke, Charles E. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1972-03)
    • Determination of Seasonal, Frequency and Durational Aspects of Streamflow with Regard to Fish Passage Through Roadway Drainage Structures

      Ashton, William S.; Carlson, Robert F. (1984-11)
      Optimal design of culverts for fish passage for each stream crossing requires the magnitude, duration, frequency and seasonal relationship of the flow and the timing of fish movement. Although previous studies have measured fish swimming abilities and culvert water velocity profiles, there are limited studies in northern regions of the hydrologic relationship among magnitude, duration, frequency and season of discharge for the design of culverts for fish passage. We analyzed streamflow records from 33 gaging stations in southcentral, western, interior, and arctic Alaska (from watersheds with a drainage area less than 100 sq. miles each) to determine the highest consecutive mean discharge with one-, three-, seven and fifteen-day durations, and the lowest consecutive mean discharge with three-, seven-, fourteen- and thirty-day durations. Streamflow during three seasons were analyzed: spring, April 1 to June 30; summer, July 1 to August 31; and fall, Septermber 1 to November 30. The lognormal distribution, using the Blom plotting position formula, was used to estimate flows at recurrence intervals of 1.25, 2, 5, 10 and 20 years. Multiple linear regression equations were developed to predict flows from ungaged watersheds. Significant basin and climatic characteristics for high flows were drainage area, mean annual precipitation and percent of the drainage basin with forest cover. Significant characteristics at low flows were drainage area, mean minimum January temperature, mean annual precipitation and percent of drainage basin covered by forests. This report provides the culvert designer with equations to predict flows, other than the instantaneous peak flow, for use in designing culverts for fish passage. Two example problems are given to show the application of these equations.
    • Development of a Conceptual Hydrologic Model for a Sub-Arctic Watershed

      Carlson, Robert F. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1972-06)
      The Caribou-Poker Creek Research Watershed began as an Alaskan inter-agency effort in 1969. As more data becomes accumulated, as more hydrologic analysis is accomplished and as a greater variety of activities are carried out on the watershed, there is a need to understand the complete hydrologic system of the watershed. This report describes the development of a general hydrologic system model which describes the runoff occurrence on the watershed. The model will provide a basis upon which to make comparative observations, to suggest changes in·the model structure and to point out further measurement needs. A conceptual model study such as this work should not be thought of as a final answer to all systems analysis within the watershed or even the most desirable answer in many cases. There is a definite need, however, for a conceptual model because of the variety of activities and investigators, many of which do not have a complete understanding of the whole system. A complete and flexible conceptual model provides a convenient focal point for all types of investigators, regardless of their background and interest in the overall system. The Caribou-Poker Creek Research Watershed is located approximately 25 miles northwest of Fairbanks, Alaska. It is about 40 square miles in size and covers a variety of terrain which is typical of Interior Alaska. Other details concerning this watershed may be found in Slaughter (1971). Results of hydrologic data to date has been primarily data collection and reporting (Slaughter, 1972). The model as it is offered in this report is not intended to be a complete study of conceptual watershed modeling. Rather, the intention is to illustrate the derivation of a conceptual model and illustrate how it is applied to a particular watershed.
    • Development of an Operational Northern Aquatic Ecosystem Model: Completion Report

      Carlson, Robert F.; Fox, Patricia M.; LaPerriere, Jacqueline D. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1977-06)
    • Effect of Waste Discharges into a Silt-laden Estuary: A Case Study of Cook Inlet, Alaska

      Murphy, R. Sage; Carlson, Robert F.; Nyquist, David; Britch, Robert (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1972-11)
      Cook Inlet is not well known. Although its thirty-foot tidal range is widely appreciated, its other characteristics, such as turbulence, horizontal velocities of flow, suspended sediment loads, natural biological productivity, the effects of fresh water inflows, temperature, and wind stresses, are seldom acknowledged. The fact that the Inlet has not been used for recreation nor for significant commercial activity explains why the average person is not more aware of these characteristics. Because of the gray cast created by the suspended sediments in the summer and the ice floes in the winter, the Inlet does not have the aura of a beautiful bay or fjord. The shoreline is inhospitable for parks and development, the currents too strong for recreational activities, and, because of the high silt concentration, there is little fishing. Yet, Cook Inlet, for all its negative attributes, can in no way be considered an unlimited dumping ground for the wastes of man. It may be better suited for this purpose than many bays in North America, but it does have a finite capacity for receiving wastes without unduly disturbing natural conditions. This report was written for the interested layman by engineers and scientists who tried to present some highly technical information in such a manner that it could be understood by environmentalists, concerned citizens, students, decision makers, and lawmakers alike. In attempting to address such a diverse audience, we risked failing to be completely understood by any one group. However, all too often research results are written solely for other researchers, a practice which leads to the advancement of knowledge but not necessarily to its immediate use by practicing engineers nor to its inclusion in social, economic, and political decision-making processes. We hope this report will shorten the usual time lag between the acquisition of new information and its use. Several additional reports will be available for a limited distribution. These will be directed to technicians who wish to know the mathematical derivations, assumptions, and other scientific details used in the study. Technical papers by the individual authors, published in national and international scientific and engineering journals, are also anticipated.
    • Effects of seasonability and variability of streamflow on nearshore coastal areas: final report

      Carlson, Robert F.; Seifert, Richard D.; Kane, Douglas L. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1977-01)
      General nature and scope of the study: This study examines the variability of streamflow in all gaged Alaskan rivers and streams which terminate in the ocean. Forty-one such streams have been gaged for varying periods of time by the U. S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division. Attempts have been made to characterize streamflow statistically using standard hydrological methods. The analysis scheme which was employed is shown in the flow chart which follows. In addition to the statistical characterization, the following will be described for each stream when possible: 1. average period of break-up initiation (10-day period) 2. average period of freeze-up (10-day period) 3. miscellaneous break-up and freeze-up data. 4. relative hypsometric curve for each basin 5. observations on past ice-jam flooding 6. verbal description of annual flow variation 7. original indices developed in this study to relate streamflow variability to basin characteristics and regional climate.
    • Effects of Thermal Discharge Upon a Subarctic Stream: Completion Report

      Carlson, Robert F.; Tilsworth, Timothy; Hok, Charlotte (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1978-06)
    • Flood Frequency Design in Sparse-data Regions

      Carlson, Robert F.; Fox, Patricia M. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1978-06)
      This report summarizes work conducted with funds received from the Office of Water Research and Technology (OWRT), Project B-030-ALAS, Flood Frequency in Sparse-Data Regions. The study was conducted from July 1, 1974, to June 30, 1976, plus a one-year extension to June 30, 1977. The technical results are given in a number of publications which are referenced and abstracted here along with a presentation of the overall philosophy of the project and a coherent summary of the work. Alaska may be characterized, as can most northern areas, by a very sparse data collection network of hydrologic variables. In combination with several physical characteristics of northern hydrology, the sparse data network leads to a very difficult design circumstance. The most well known physical aspect of northern hydrology is permafrost. Other factors of importance are large elevation differences, regional inhomogeneity, high latitude, low temperatures, and the very dynamic nature of the spring breakup. These factors, in combination with the short data base in northern regions, cause hydrologic design to have a large degree of uncertainty.
    • Flood Frequency Estimation in Northern Sparse Data Regions: Completion Report

      Carlson, Robert F.; Fox, Patricia (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1974-07)
      The primary objective of this project was to complete development of an arctic hydrologic model and to evaluate its usefulness in generating information useful for a design tool in estimation of peak flow discharges. The peak flow discharges studied were those generally analyzed and evaluated in the design of facilities for stream crossings.
    • Hydrology of the Central Arctic River Basins of Alaska

      Kane, Douglas L.; Carlson, Robert F. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1973-12)
    • Improvement of the Fairbanks Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide Transport Model -- A Program for Calibration, Verification and Implementation

      Carlson, Robert F.; Hok, Charlotte (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1980-10)
      In the early 70s, state, local and federal officials in Fairbanks, Alaska, became concerned with the rising incidence of high carbon monoxide episodes. Because of that concern, the Alaska Department of Highways (forerunner of the Department of Transportation and Public Facilities) and the Fairbanks North Star Borough requested that the Institute of Water Resources undertake a study to develop a computer model capability for understanding the transport of carbon monoxide and other pollutants within the Fairbanks airshed. The work was completed in June of 1976. Two publications (Carlson and Fox, 1976; Norton and Carlson, 1976) describe the initial development, documentation and implementation of the computer model. The model, ACOSP (Atmospheric Carbon monOxide Simulation Program), describes the two-dimensional behavior of pollutants in the atmosphere via solution of the convection-diffusion equation using the finite element method of numerical analysis.
    • Methods of Flood Flow Determination in Sparse Data Regions

      Carlson, Robert F.; Fox, Patricia M.; Shrader, Stephen D. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1974-06)
    • Modeling snowmelt runoff in an arctic coastal plain

      Carlson, Robert F.; Norton, William; McDougall, James (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1974-01)
      Present and impending oil exploration and development activity on Alaska's Arctic Coastal Plain has created a need to better understand the region's water resources. The remoteness of the area and an almost complete lack of hydrologic data preclude the use of usual hydrologic analysis techniques. Attempts by the Institute of Water Resources to synthesize this data led to the development of snowmelt runoff models which simulate the spring runoff, an important part of the hydrologic system. The snowmelt model produces a snowmelt hydrograph which is converted by the runoff model into a runoff hydrograph. The snowmelt model subdivides the snowpack into two layers. Daily climatological parameters govern the heat transfer between snowpack and atmosphere. Once the heat flux received or emitted by the snowpack has been computed, the melting processes within the snowpack are considered. Computed parameters of the snowpack are density, depth, water equivalent, water content, temperature, and thermal quality. The runoff model uses a three-parameter linear storage model to transform the snowmelt hydrograph into a runoff hydrograph. The parameters represent the amount of storage, the rate of runoff, and the lag between snowmelt and runoff. Using Prudhoe Bay weather data as input, and comparing the output to runoff data from the Kuparuk, Putuligayuk, and Sagavanirktok Rivers for the years 1970 and 1971, produced results which indicate that the models perform satisfactorily.
    • A Northern Snowmelt Model

      McDougall, James; Carlson, Robert F. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1974-08)
      In early 1968, a large petroleum discovery was made in the Prudhoe Bay area of Alaska's Arctic Coastal Plain. This discovery has led Alaska into a period of development of unprecedented speed and magnitude. This development will require the construction of many engineering facilities which are affected by the water resources. The design of each of these requires an understanding of the hydrologic system, a system which is dominated in Alaska by low temperatures, high latitudes, large elevation differences and sparse data. The latter factor is unique to Alaska and makes application of common design techniques virtually impossible.
    • Report of the Joint U.S.-Canadian Northern Civil Engineering Research Workshop

      Carlson, Robert F.; Morgenstern, N. R. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1978-03-20)
      The Joint Canadian-United States Northern Civil Engineering Research Workshop was held at the University of Alberta campus, Edmonton, Alberta on March 20 through 22, 1978. Over 40 participants from government, universities, and private practice from both the U.S. and Canada discussed northern civil engineering research for 2 1/2 days. The results of their effort are presented in this report. The nature of a report coming from spontaneous conversation will be somewhat uneven in coverage, language, and tone. However, we feel obligated to preserve the initial intent and language of the various workshop groups and each report should represent the original conclusion as nearly as possible. We acted as the principal instigators of the workshop and were ably assisted by an excellent group of workshop chairmen: Jack Clark, Lorne Gold, Charles Neill, Daniel Rogness, James Rooney, and Daniel Smith. We particularly want to acknowledge the assistance of the Boreal Institute for organizing and providing much of the administrative and secretarial support for the workshop, and the staff of the Institute of Water Resources for assisting with the organizing and publication processes. The workshop was sponsored by the National Science Foundation of the United States, the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs of Canada, the Boreal Institute and Department of Civil Engineering of the University of Alberta, and the Institute of Water Resources of the University of Alaska. R. F. Carlson N. R. Morgenstern
    • Retrofit Design of Drainage Structures for Improved Fish Passage: Literature Review

      Blevins, Vanessa; Carlson, Robert F. (1988-06)
      This report reviews existing literature on issues relevant to retrofitting culverts to mitigate fish passage barriers. The analysis of this information will set the stage for future laboratory experimentation on various retrofitting techniques. The topics in this report include a review of fish swimming capabilities, hydrologic factors involved in choosing a design flow, fish passage problems resulting from conventional culvert design, and potential retrofit solutions to these problems.