• Evaluation of Deicer Impacts on Pervious Concrete Specimens (Phase II)

      Haselbach, Liv; Temizel-Sekeryan, Sila; Ross, Molly; Almeida, Nara (Center for Environmentally Sustainable Transportation in Cold Climates, 2018-05-31)
      This research examined the chemical degradation of pervious concrete due to calcium chloride or magnesium chloride deicers. The project consisted of Phase I, Phase IIa, and Phase IIb. Phase I was previous work where a testing protocol was developed to mimic deicer applications. Phases IIa and IIb are parts of this project. Phase IIa used split tensile testing on Phase I specimens and further evaluated the chemical data from Phase I magnesium chloride applications. Phase IIb repeated the Phase I protocol for a larger number of new ordinary Portland cement specimens and evaluated the impact on strength using the unconfined compressive strength test. The hypotheses were based on complexation and precipitation chemistry. Specimens subjected to calcium chloride showed visible degradation. Specimens exposed to magnesium chloride deicer showed a large increase in loss of calcium ions in Phase I. Both deicers showed a loss in strength compared with a water control in Phase IIb. Results from the split tensile testing were inconclusive. The protocol from Phase I with the unconfined compression test may be an effective testing procedure to determine if different designs might be more resistant to chemical degradation by these two deicing chemicals.
    • Prediction of Thermal Behavior of Pervious Concrete Pavements in Winter

      Chen, Zhao; Nantasai, Benjamin; Nassiri, Somayeh; Haselbach, Liv (Center for Environmentally Sustainable Transportation in Cold Climates, 2017-05-15)
      Because application of pervious concrete pavement (PCPs) has extended to cold-climate regions of the United States, the safety and mobility of PCP installations during the winter season need to be maintained. Timely application of salt, anti-icing, and deicing agents for ice/snow control is most effective in providing sufficient surface friction when done at a suitable pavement surface temperature. The aim of this project was to determine the thermal properties of PCP during the winter season, and to develop a theoretical model to predict PCP surface temperature. The project included a laboratory and a field component. In the laboratory, thermal conductivity of pervious concrete was determined. A linear relationship was established between thermal conductivity and porosity for pervious concrete specimens. In the field, the pavement temperature in a PCP sidewalk installation at Washington State University was monitored via in-pavement instrumentation. Based on the field data, the Enhanced Integrated Climatic Model (EICM) was developed and validated for the site, using PCP thermal properties and local climatic data. The EICM-predicted PCP surface temperature during the winter season agreed well with the field temperature. Overall, the predicted number of days that the pavement surface fell below 32°F agreed well with the number based on field data for 85% of the days. Therefore, the developed model is useful in identifying those days to apply deicer agents. Finally, a regression model using climatic indices was developed for PCP surface temperature prediction in the absence of a more advanced temperature model.
    • Stormwater-Pavement Interface in Cold Climates

      Haselbach, Liv; Nassiri, Somayeh (Center for Environmentally Sustainable Transportation in Cold Climates, 2017-05-27)
      This project relates to “managing stormwater runoff in cold climates” and addresses the feasibility of low-impact development at a regional demonstration site in eastern Washington. The studies relate to seven large permeable pavement systems. The findings for similar climates and soils are as follows:  The draindown times for retention in Palouse or similar clay soils may handle many typical storms.  On average, every square foot of a permeable pavement system installed also receives run-on from another square foot of impermeable pavement, doubling its impact on both stormwater quantity reduction and stormwater quality improvement.  Most of the clogged sections on various applications were downslope of other areas.  Permeable pavements installed in areas targeted for additional stormwater quantity control and quality improvement may be feasible.  On average, the cleaning for installations is less frequent than annually. Power washing plus vacuuming appears to be an effective method for pervious concrete.  Surface distress was usually where vehicles turned, or from placement activities.  Preliminary studies on various surface treatments on pervious concrete show promise for added safety benefits under wintry conditions.  Both detention-type and retention-type permeable pavement systems appear to have little negative impact on neighboring soils in the winter under the study conditions. However, further research is needed for different designs of retention-type systems to ensure that water volumes in the aggregate storage bed do not allow for sufficient water flow into neighboring soils that might result in ice lens formation or other negative impacts.
    • Transportation Life Cycle Assessment Synthesis: Life Cycle Assessment Learning Module Series

      Haselbach, Liv; Langfitt, Quinn (Center for Environmentally Sustainable Transportation in Cold Climates, 2015-03-12)
      The Life Cycle Assessment Learning Module Series is a set of narrated, self-advancing slideshows on various topics related to environmental life cycle assessment (LCA). This research project produced the first 27 of such modules, which are freely available for download on the CESTiCC website http://cem.uaf.edu/cesticc/publications/lca.aspx. Each module is roughly 15- 20 minutes in length and is intended for various uses such as course components, as the main lecture material in a dedicated LCA course, or for independent learning in support of research projects. The series is organized into four overall topical areas, each of which contain a group of overview modules and a group of detailed modules. The A and α groups cover the international standards that define LCA. The B and β groups focus on environmental impact categories. The G and γ groups identify software tools for LCA and provide some tutorials for their use. The T and τ groups introduce topics of interest in the field of transportation LCA. This includes overviews of how LCA is frequently applied in that sector, literature reviews, specific considerations, and software tutorials. Future modules in this category will feature methodological developments and case studies specific to the transportation sector.