• Air-to-Air Heat Recovery Devices for Small Buildings

      Zarling, John P. (1981-01)
      With the escalation of fuel costs, many people are turning to tighter, better insulated buildings as a means of achieving energy conservation. This is especially true in northern climates, where heating seasons are long and severe. Installing efficient well sealed vapor barriers and weather stripping and caulking around doors and windows reduces cold air infiltration but can lead to damaging moisture buildup, as well as unpleasant and even unhealthy accumulations of odors and gases. To provide the necessary ventilation air to maintain air quality in homes while holding down energy costs, air-to-air heat exchangers have been proposed for residential and other simple structures normally not served by an active or forced ventilation system. Four basic types of air-to-air heat exchangers are suited for small scale use: rotary, coil-loop, heat pipe, and plate. The operating principles of each of these units are presented and their individual advantages and disadvantages are discusses. A test program has been initiated to evaluate the performance of a few commercial units as well as several units designed and/or built at the University of Alaska. Preliminary results from several of these tests are presented along with a critique on their design.
    • Air-to-Air Heat Recovery Devices for Small Buildings

      Zarling, John P. (1982-05)
      With the escalation of fuel costs, many people are turning to tighter, better insulated buildings as a means of achieving energy conservation. This is especially true in norther climates, where heating seasons are long and severe. Installing efficient well sealed vapor barriers and weather stripping and caulking around doors and windows reduces cold air infiltration but can lead to damaging moisture buildup, as well as unpleasant and even unhealthy accumulations of odors and gases. To provide the necessary ventilation air to maintain air quality in homes while holding down energy costs, air-to-air heat exchangers have been proposed for residential and other simple structures normally not served by an active or forced ventilation system. Four basic types of air-to-air heat exchangers are suited for small scale use: rotary, coil-loop, heat pipe, and plate. The operating principles of each of these units are presented and their individual advantages and disadvantages are discussed. A test program has been initiated to evaluate the performance of a few commercial units as well as several units designed and/or built at the University of Alaska. Preliminary results from several of these tests are presented along with a critique on their design.
    • Datalogger Evaluation

      Zarling, John P.; Kinney, Thomas C.; McGilvary, Randy; Briggs, Rick (1986-01)
    • Solar Assisted Culvert Thawing Device Phase I

      Zarling, John P. (1981-11)
      A solar assisted culvert thawing device has been designed, constructed, and installed as an alternate method for the prevention and control of roadway flooding and icing. The proposed solar thawing device is a maintenance-free system and relieves the labor-intensive and expensive culvert thawing methods presently used
    • Solar Assisted Culvert Thawing Device Phase II

      Zarling, John P.; Murray, Douglas H. (1983-05)
      A reflective type concentrating solar collector system has been designed, constructed and installed on an ice plugged roadway culvert as a means of melting a channel for water flow. The system consisted of four reflecting collectors, a circulating pump, and a thaw pipe mounted in the culvert. Photovoltaic panels were used as the source of power for the pump. A design analysis and performance characteristics are given for the solar collectors, circulating pump, and photovoltaic panels.
    • Solar Energy Resource Potential in Alaska

      Seifert, Richard D.; Zarling, John P. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1978-03)
      Solar energy applications are receiving attention in Alaska as in much of the rest of the country. Solar energy possibilities for Alaska include domestic water heating, hot-water or hot-air collection for space heating, and the use of passive solar heating in residential or commercial buildings. As a first analysis, this study concentrated on applying solar energy to domestic hot-water heating needs (not space heating) in Alaska, and an analysis of solar hot-water heating economics was performed using the F-CHART solar energy simulation computer program. Results indicate that solar energy cannot compete economically with oil-heated domestic hot water at any of the five study locations in Alaska, but that it may be economical in comparison with electrically heated hot water if solar collector systems can be purchased and installed for $20 to $25 per square foot.
    • Thermal Properties of Metal Stud Walls

      Zarling, John P.; Braley, W. Alan; Strandberg, James S.; Bell, Scott V. (1984-07)
    • Thermosyphon Devices and Slab-on-Grade Foundation Design

      Zarling, John P.; Haynes, F. Donald (1985-06)
      Subgrade cooling methods to prevent thermal degradation of permafrost in cold regions include the use of thermosyphons with inclined evaporator sections. This laboratory study was conducted to determine the thermal performance characteristics of two commercially available thermosyphons. Evaporator inclination angles ranged from 0(degrees) to 12(degrees) from the horizontal, and air speeds ranged from 0 to 13.4 miles per hour over the finned condenser sections. Two standard full size thermosyphons, one charged with CO2, carbon dioxide and the other with NH3, anhydrous ammonia, were tested in CRREL's atmospheric wind tunnel. Empirical expressions are presented for heat removal rates as a function of air speed, ambient air temperature and evaporator inclination angle. An analytical method is also presented to approximate thermal design of foundations using thermosyphons under buildings with a slab-on-grade. We present heat gains from the slab and pad to the thermosyphon as well as the evaporator temperature as functions of time.