• Assessment of the Contribution of Traffic Emissions to the Mobile Vehicle Measured PM2.5 Concentration by Means of WRF-CMAQ Simulations

      Molders, Nicole; Tran, Huy N.Q. (Alaska University Transportation Center, Fairbanks Northstar Borough, 2012)
    • Assessment of tight gas sands in Cook Inlet Basin

      Patel, Kanhaiyalal U.; Ogbe, David O.; Zhu, Tao; Patil, Shirish L. (2005-05)
      The Cook Inlet Basin is the source for all of the natural gas used in south-central Alaska. The estimated ultimate recovery from existing Cook Inlet gas fields is approximately 8.5 trillion cubic feet (tcf) and the proven reserves remaining on January 1, 2004 were 1.8 tcf. It will be difficult to meet the peak demand for gas in south-central Alaska after 2009. Cook Inlet Basin contains vast quantities of unconventional gas resources in tight sands. Resources-in-place and producible gas reserves from the tight sands are unknown. It is likely that these tight sands will be developed as additional gas reserves and will be produced along with the high permeability conventional gas reserves in order to meet both local and export demands. The objectives of this study are to quantify the distribution of tight gas sands; to estimate the resources in place and producible gas reserves in the Cook Inlet Basin; and to predict the post-stimulation gas production. Rate transient analysis, well log analysis and reservoir stimulation analysis were therefore conducted on selected key tight sand wells. Results indicate that the tight gas can play an important role in meeting south-central Alaska's gas demand beyond 2009.
    • An Atmospheric carbon monoxide transport model for Fairbanks, Alaska

      Carlson, Robert F.; Fox, John (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1976-06)
      A comprehensive computer model of atmospheric carbon monoxide transport has been developed for Fairbanks, Alaska. The model, based on a finite element method computational scheme, accents input from specified vehicle traffic parameters inc1uding miles per day, number of cold starts, and total idle time. The carbon monoxide concentrations are calculated for specified time intervals at numerous points throughout the urban area. A test of the model against the data of January 22, 1975, indicates a good correspondence. Extremely high carbon monoxide concentration were calculated at an unmeasured point down wind of the business district. The model should prove useful for a number of community needs including parking management, planning and zoning, episode strategy planning, and carbon monoxide forecasting.
    • Attenuation and Effectiveness of Triclopyr and 2, 4-D Along Alaska Highway Rights-of-Way in a Continental and a Coastal Subarctic Environment

      Barnes, David; Seefeldt, Steve (Alaska University Transportation Center, 2009-12)
      After more than 20 years of only mechanical brush cutting, ADOT&PF evaluated the use of herbicides to manage vegetation that interferes with line-of-sight and maintenance of the roadway. While researchers have investigated herbicide effectiveness and attenuation in more-temperate climates, little study has focused on cold regions. The purpose of this project was to measure the effectiveness and attenuation of two different selective auxin-type herbicides, 2, 4 dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinyl acetic acid (triclopyr) in two subarctic climates; an extremely cold continental climate and a maritime climate. Conclusions from this study will aid the ADOT&PF in developing a plan for controlling vegetation along highway rights-of-way in Alaska.
    • Attenuation and Effectiveness of Triclopyr and 2,4-D Along Alaska Highway Rights-of-Way in a Continental and a Coastal Subarctic Environment

      Barnes, David L.; Seefeldt, Steve (Alaska University Transportation Center, Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities, 2009)
    • Attenuation of the herbicide glyphosate along railroad corridors in Alaska

      Ballou, Nellie B. (2011-05)
      Following the application of glyphosate in the formulation of AquaMaster® at two contrasting sub-arctic zones along the railroad corridor in Alaska, attenuation of the herbicide glyphosate was investigated. Study sites were established in continental and coastal zones. Glyphosate soil attenuation was similar to temperate regions during the growing season but exhibited an extended persistence during the winter months. Although glyphosate microbial degradation likely slowed during winter, both sites showed evidence of slight glyphosate degradation during the winter months. The coastal site attenuated more rapidly than the continental site which is presumably due to increased rainfall relative to the continental site. Glyphosate attenuation at the coastal site was likely driven by dispersion while microbial degradation was responsible for the attenuation of glyphosate at the continental site. Movement to subsurface soils (10-25 cm) at low concentrations was observed at both sites with slightly more transport at the coastal site than the continental site. Glyphosate transport to groundwater along railroad corridors was not conclusive. Vegetation cover reduction was reduced at the continental site but could not be determined at the coastal site.
    • Attitude determination for small satellites using gps signal-to-noise ratio

      Peters, Daniel; Raskovic, Dejan; Hawkins, Joseph; Thorsen, Denise (2014-05)
      An embedded system for GPS-based attitude determination (AD) using signal-to-noise (SNR) measurements was developed for CubeSat applications. The design serves as an evaluation testbed for conducting ground based experiments using various computational methods and antenna types to determine the optimum AD accuracy. Raw GPS data is also stored to non-volatile memory for downloading and post analysis. Two low-power microcontrollers are used for processing and to display information on a graphic screen for real-time performance evaluations. A new parallel inter-processor communication protocol was developed that is faster and uses less power than existing standard protocols. A shorted annular patch (SAP) antenna was fabricated for the initial ground-based AD experiments with the testbed. Static AD estimations with RMS errors in the range of 2.5° to 4.8° were achieved over a range of off-zenith attitudes.
    • AUTC Newsletter v1 n1

      Alaska University Transportation Center (Alaska University Transportation Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2007-04)
    • AUTC Newsletter v2 n1

      Alaska University Transportation Center (Alaska University Transportation Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2008-06)
    • AUTC Newsletter v2 n2

      Alaska University Transportation Center (Alaska University Transportation Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2009-03)
    • AUTC Newsletter v3 n1

      Alaska University Transportation Center (Alaska University Transportation Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2009-05)
    • AUTC Newsletter v3 n2

      Alaska University Transportation Center (Alaska University Transportation Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2010-02)
    • AUTC newsletter v4 n1

      Alaska University Transportation Center (Alaska University Transportation Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2010-05)
    • AUTC Newsletter v4 n2

      Alaska University Transportation Center (Alaska University Transportation Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2010-12)
    • AUTC Newsletter v5 n1

      Alaska University Transportation Center (Alaska University Transportation Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2011-05)
    • AUTC Newsletter v5 n2

      Alaska University Transportation Center (Alaska University Transportation Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2012-04)
    • AUTC Newsletter v6 n1

      Alaska University Transportation Center (Alaska University Transportation Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2012-06)
    • AUTC Newsletter v6 n2

      Alaska University Transportation Center (Alaska University Transportation Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2013-01)
    • AUTC Newsletter v7 n1

      Alaska University Transportation Center (Alaska University Transportation Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2013-07)
    • Automated processing system for tidal analysis of MF radar winds

      Vemula, Sreenivas (2005-12)
      The medium frequency (MF) radar at Platteville, Colorado (40.18° N, 104.7° W) is used to estimate the zonal and meridional wind motions in the middle atmosphere. This radar has been in operation since January 2000. We currently have four years of wind estimates sampled every five minutes. An automated processing system has been developed in IDL to process these estimates and obtain the monthly mean winds and tidal parameters. The automated processing currently processes the wind estimates in time domain analysis using a least square fitting technique. The criteria for determining when the estimated tidal parameters are valid have been studied along with the error analysis of the data and processing. The diurnal and semidiurnal parameters are obtained using this least square fitting method and these tidal parameters are assumed to be valid only when the condition number is less than 10. In the spectral domain, the fast Fourier transform and Lomb-Scargle periodogram methods have been studied. A test signal is generated and its performance using both FFT and Lomb-Scargle methods are discussed for three different cases which are equivalent to our actual data. The results of the wind estimates from 2000-2003 collected using the MF radar have been processed using the automated processing system. This automated processing system can be used to generate the wind parameters on a 24 hour, 7 day a week basis for an elaborate study. Our data are compared with MF radar data from Saskatoon, Canada and Urbana, lllinois. Most of the time our data are similar to the behavior of GSWM-02 model.