• Winter Precipitation Depths Across The North Slope Of Alaska Simulated From The Weather Research And Forcasting Model And Snowtran-3D

      Byam, Sarah Jean; Cherry, Jessica E.; Toniolo, Horacio; Kane, Douglas (2012)
      Accurately predicting snow distribution and blowing snow conditions in the Arctic is critical to the design of ice road construction and maintenance as well as for predicting water supplies and runoff during snowmelt, estimating the cost of snow removal, and forecasting tundra travel conditions. A current atmospheric model used by both the operational weather prediction and research communities is the Weather Research and Forecasting model. However, the built-in snow schemes in the model neglect redistribution of snow via wind, one of the key processes in snow pack evolution. This study will involve three parts: (1) diagnostic of the differences in the current snow schemes of the model, (2) evaluation of the model's snow schemes as compared to observational data, and (3) asynchronous coupling of the SnowTran-3D to model predictions using a simple algorithm. The approach provides a simple method for the prediction of snow distribution, improving the realism of current snow distribution models, and will be easily employable for both operational and research applications.
    • Winter soil water dynamics: Completion report

      Kane, D. L. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1975-12)
      The movement of soil moisture through cold regions soils is an active process that continues throughout the year. It represents one mechanism of heat transport in subsurface soil, conduction being the main mode of heat flow. In frozen soils, this moisture may undergo phase change resulting in two significant events: 1. deformation of the near-surface layer, and 2. liberation or uptake of heat at the point of phase change. Where deformation (induced by either frost heaving or thaw consolidation) occurs in man-made embankments, it is readily apparent at the surface. Restoration of the deformed surface requires large sums of money.
    • Wireless communication protocol architectures for nanosensor networks

      Zhang, Zhongping (2004-05)
      Recent developments in micro fabrication and nanotechnology will enable the inexpensive manufacturing of massive numbers of tiny computing elements with sensors. New programming paradigms are required to obtain organized and coherent behavior from the cooperation of large numbers of sensor nodes. The individual nodes are identical, randomly placed and unreliable. They communicate with a small local neighborhood via wireless broadcast. In such environments, where individual nodes have limited resources, aggregating the node into groups is useful for specialization, increased robustness, and efficient resource allocation. In this paper, an application-specific self-organization protocol stack is developed. The clustering process is divided into phases. The first phase is to know the neighbor nodes. The second phase is to set up the cluster and routing. A 'find maximum clique algorithm' is used to set up clusters. A back off method is used to set up the hop field and routing. Group leaders set up a TDMA schedule for steady state operation. This schedule ensures that there is no conflict among in the same cluster and between clusters. Direct-sequence spread spectrum (DS-SS) is used to avoid inter-group conflict. The limited power resource is a challenge in nanosensor networks. This paper uses two different ways to analyze energy consumed in nanosensor networks, energy cost field and bit flow method. Sensor node deployment, cluster size, and propagation condition effect are discussed in this paper by those two methods respectively.
    • A wireless early warning sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) detection device

      Rider, Patrick Jason (2006-12)
      The sudden and unexplained death of an infant younger than one year, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), is currently the leading cause of death for infants in the United States. This thesis gives the design for a prototype of an early warning SIDS detection device. The prototype monitors three parameters; temperature, motion, and level of oxygen saturation in blood. Data of these parameters is transmitted wirelessly to a remote location for data analysis. Hardware limitations result in delaying the integration of all three sensor signals for a later period. Greater improvements in the hardware will allow for both a decrease in error and combined integration of all three sensor signals. Future work to this project will also include additional sensors, miniaturization of the product, and live testing.
    • Work Plan for Special Design Features & Crack Sealing Maintenance for Parks Highway

      Liu, Juanyu; McHattie, Robert (Alaska University Transportation Center, Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities, 2013)
    • Zeolite deposits of possible economic significance on the northern Alaska Peninsula

      Madonna, J.A. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1982)
      Clinoptilolite, mordenite, haulandite and laumontite have been identified in possible economic concentrations on the Alaska Peninsula. Most important are 1) a haulandite bearing water-laid tuff on Agate Island, 2) a thick sequence of terrestrial volcanics containing mordenite and clinoptilolite located between Squirrel Point and Tommy Creek, 3) water-laid tuffs containing high concentrations of clinoptilolite near Dennis Creek and 4) a haulandite bearing siltstone at Chinitna Bay. Zeolite formation in the Iliamna Lake area was produced in "open" systems of fresh water lakes and ground water systems which have transformed vitric volcanic material into zeolites. Burial diagenesis is responsible for alteration of early formed, low temperature-pressure zeolites into high temperature-pressure varieties. The formation of laumontite in a tuffaceous sandstone at Chinitna Bay was the result of low grade burial metamorphism. The mode of formation of haulandite in a welded tuff and siltstone unit, also located at Chinitna Bay, appears to have resulted from diagensis alteration of terrestrial sediments. Transportation of zeolite ore from Iliamna Lake would be by lake to Pile Bay Village then by road to Iliamna Bay and, finally, by ship to the consumer. In the Chinitna Bay area ore can be loaded directly onto ships for transportation to the consumer.