• A Narrative Study Of The Lived Experience Of Contemporary American Women In Intimate Relationships With Men Who Have Chronic Low Back Pain

      Heath, Gina; Brown, Jin (2008)
      Everyone experiences pain to one degree or another, but pain that has outlived its usefulness in assisting the body to avoid injury, and causes other physical and emotional complications, is known as chronic pain. In American medicine, chronic pain is described as that which persists longer than six months and is not relieved by standard medical care. Chronic pain usually leads to a spectrum of other physical and emotional complications, including sleep disturbance, loss of appetite, and severe depression, among many others. Creating and maintaining relationships with others takes effort and energy, and this is especially true in a marital relationship. Marriage between two able-bodied people is challenging enough, so the added variable of chronic pain forms new dimensions of relationship difficulty that must be addressed.
    • Keeping The Home Fires Burning: The Effects Of Military Induced Separations On Marital Intimacy From A Female Perspective

      Cynar, Deborah J.; McWherter, Pamela (2008)
      In this study, a convenience sample of 56 female, married, military wives in northwestern community responded to a survey questionnaire concerning intimacy promoting communication skills, marital satisfaction, and military induced separations. The results indicated a strong correlation between marital satisfaction and intimacy promoting communication skills. This study also explores the difference between the type and frequency of military induced separations and their influence on marital satisfaction and intimacy promoting communication skills. To further describe this military population, several post hoc tests for difference found significance between military branch affiliation, and between those who had or had not received premarital counseling on levels of perceived marital satisfaction, and intimacy promoting communication skills. Further, no significant difference was found to exist between education level or employment status of the at home spouse on levels of perceived marital satisfaction and intimacy promoting communication skills. A description of the implications of the findings, and suggestions for future research are discussed.