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  • Mythic women reborn: Djebar's Scheherazade & Atwood's Penelope

    Frentzko, Brianna Nicole; Brightwell, Geraldine; Harney, Eileen; Carr, Rich; Johnson, Sara Eliza (2019-05)
    This thesis examines how two modern female writers approach the retelling of stories involving mythic heroines. Assia Djebar's A Sister to Scheherazade repurposes Arabian Nights to reclaim a sisterly solidarity rooted in a pre-colonial Algerian female identity rather than merely colonized liberation. In approaching the oppressive harem through the lens of the bond between Scheherazade and her sister Dinarzade, Djebar allows women to transcend superficial competition and find true freedom in each other. Margaret Atwood's The Penelopiad interrogates the idealized wife Penelope from Homer's Odyssey in order to highlight its heroine's complicity in male violence against women. Elevating the disloyal maids whom Odysseus murders, Atwood questions the limitations of sisterhood and the need to provide visibility, voice, and justice for the forgotten victims powerful men have dismissed and destroyed. The two novels signal a shift in feminist philosophy from the need for collective action to the need to recognize individual narratives. Both texts successfully re-appropriate the dominant myths they retell to propose a more nuanced and complicated view of what it means to be "Woman."
  • Selections from Nature's womb & perhaps her grave

    Frentzko, Brianna Nicole; Brightwell, Geraldine; Harney, Eileen; Carr, Rich; Johnson, Sara Eliza (2019-05)
    Traversing a wintry landscape filled with desperate scavengers who cannot die, a witch awaits a prophecy to lead her people to the light. Meanwhile, in London, the addictive virtual reality of the Undercity tears a family apart. And, on a distant island long ago, a young girl befriends an enigmatic sailor who emerges from under the sea on top a tattered black ship. These three worlds and the women within them are connected by a single choice made long ago that ripples through time and pushes them towards their own evolving destinies. This thesis comprises the first two of five sections ("books") in a novel entitled Nature's Womb & Perhaps Her Grave. Book I, "In Chains of Darkness," follows Witch-Woman, a crone living in a world of night and snow. When she adopts the mysterious Twice-Born-Child, Witch- Woman must navigate raising her defiant daughter as well as protecting Village by River from the threat of starvation or invading wild-ones. Book II, "The City of Ghosts," depicts the struggles of five women in a dysfunctional family. Elena tries to retrieve her daughter from the Undercity, Orpah awaits her opportunity to plug in to virtual reality, Ruth attempts to prevent the maidservant from bearing her son-in-law's baby, Deborah works to save her sister from damnation, and Beatrice must decide what to do with the illegitimate child she carries in her womb. All the while, London ticks closer and closer to the day when the real world will give way to the virtual dreams of the Undercity. Playing with Judea-Christian mythos and science fiction themes, Nature's Womb & Perhaps Her Grave is, at its heart, a story about mothers and daughters confronting the dangerous power, tremendous responsibility, and unforeseen consequences of rebellion.
  • "Dance, dance, dance: Alaska stories"

    Wise, Zoë E.; Soos, Frank; Johnson, Sara; Heyne, Eric (2019-05)
    Dance, Dance, Dance: Alaska Stories is a collection of young women's coming of age stories. The protagonists range in age from teenager to middle aged, and the circumstances that provoke their epiphanies include events spanning from the mundane to the dramatic, such as looking through a photo album, and death. Protagonists who move through these cumulative events seek to emerge from past identities and understandings of themselves. In all of these stories the Alaskan setting is important. Physical environment, in some stories, is only perceived to be a barrier; in other stories, the setting functions as a conflict that frustrates characters' desires. Regardless, all protagonists, to a degree, ultimately realize themselves to be a barrier, and must overcome internal conflicts before coming to terms with--or abandoning--their external environment. A technical aspect of these stories that I have particularly focused on developing is the varied point of view. The ranges of points of view in these stories include retrospective first person, second person, and third person limited. In this collection I focused on the irony that each point of view, when working with a coming of age story, can provide. Narrative distance in these stories is used to highlight the difference between what the characters know and understand and what we, the readers, understand about their situations
  • Floating: ruminations from the open-air abyss

    Nyberg, Brandi Jo Petronio; Farmer, Daryl; Soos, Frank; Schell, Jennifer (2019-05)
    This thesis is a collection of environmentally centered personal essays, some of which are also research driven. Many of the essays within are place-based and several reflect on what the word 'home' means. The research-driven essays involved conducting literature reviews within academic journals and, in some cases, weaving that information with personal narrative. Throughout the thesis, there is a loose narrative arc that follows the author's nomadic wanderings and search for home. Although a home is never quite found, the author does find a deeper meaning on what it means to call a place 'home.' While the order of essays jumps from one place to the next geographically, they are ordered in a chronological sense - although not completely. Throughout the collection, the author is in direct conversation with many writers who have inspired her own writing, including Edward Abbey, Henry Thoreau, Barry Lopez, and Terry Tempest Williams. The purpose of this project is not only to entertain readers but also to educate. The author hopes that her writing will encourage readers to strengthen their connection to place and the environment and become engaged with pressing environmental issues, such as mountaintop removal mining.
  • She lives in Ohio

    Luft, Andrew; Kamerling, Leonard; Johnson, Sara; Harney, Eileen (2019-05)
    Before the big screen, before an actor reads, before the assembly of a set, and before the word "film" is even uttered, a screenplay is written. The successful screenplay acts as a blueprint, or dramatic instructions, for a team of filmmakers. This screenplay may evolve over time, shrinking and expanding to fit the unique vision of a director or producer; as it should. The screenwriter's job is to write a story that is strong enough to withstand this trial period between page and screen. While the minute details may change, the story beating at the screenplay's center should survive, unphased. If the writer is in control, the screenplay will demand to someday be made into a film. She Lives in Ohio is a screenplay of the coming-of-age genre, part drama and part comedy. The story follows Jess, a typical LA teenager, as she navigates changes in both her family structure and her natural surroundings. Jess is torn from the comfort of her mother's side and shipped out east to Ohio, where she and her older brother will spend the summer with their eccentric Aunt Carrie. What begins as a colorful nightmare, soon turns into an exploration of Jess's roots that reveals more about her identity than she ever could have anticipated. In keeping with the coming-of-age genre, She Lives in Ohio depicts a pivotal moment in the protagonist's life as she is thrust out of her youth and into the reality of adulthood. However, unlike the classic coming-of-age narrative, the screenplay does not rely on internal monologue or voice-over. Rather, the story punctuates dialogue with manicured action, snippets of Midwest culture, and portraits of hobbyists and artists. Each character has her practice, her own way of integrating into her environment, which shows how she copes with her given position. This variety of themes serves to reflect the screenwriter's own fascination with the social roles that we both seek and are assigned.
  • Voices from the margins: seriality and the introductory writing classroom

    Cameron, Casie E.; Stanley, Sarah; Carr, Rich; Harney, Eileen (2019-05)
    In an era of great political division and fear of the "other," how can introductory writing classes do a better job of foregrounding marginalized voices and building classroom communities that value many different life experiences over the one presented in dominant discourse? By employing select features of the serial form including: worldbuilding for community, use of devices of continuity to bridge part-whole segmentation, and cyclical communication and recursive writing practices, voices and stories from the margins can break into dominant discourse. This paper begins and ends with my own story as it is spun and woven through the chapters. Between interludes, I initiate a layered exploration defining the origins and scope of the serial form, establish terms and identify storytelling devices that serials rely on for long-term, overarching, and influential success. Turning then to iterations of the modern serial, I explore the continued development of devices of continuity (the cliffhanger and the recap), develop further ideas of cyclical communication, and clarify how the modern serial is tied firmly with capitalism. After an analysis of the evolution of the serial form and its constituent parts, I suggest ways of incorporating certain strategies and devices of the serial form into the introductory writing classroom in order to build community; establish a cyclical, serialized communication through writing and sharing our individual stories; and normalizing outside voices. The implications of this investigation are that pedagogical repurposing of select devices of the serial can support writing instructors' efforts to amplify voices and stories from the margins bringing them into dominant discourse.
  • The maiden's firestorm

    Aruffo, Heather; Soos, Frank; Johnson, Sara Eliza; Carr, Rich (2019-05)
    The Maiden's Firestorm is a work of speculative fiction set in the fictional Solonian Worker's Republic, a country reminiscent of the Soviet Union in the 1940s. Geopolitically, the novel centers around the conflict between the Solonian Worker's Republic and the nomadic Kyzare, an ethnic group with terrifying telepathic abilities caused by an element called Yinitrium. The story is told through the point of view of two adult children of a mixed race Kyzare-Solonian family, who must navigate the consequences of their marginalized identities in a hostile world. The first point of view follows Rakell, an engineering student who is recruited to work on a top secret weapons project, and is given the choice between Party membership and denouncing her mother, a former Worker's Party member. The second point of view follows Rakell's older brother Yeordan, who is forced by the Solonian state to spy on their estranged father, a Kyzare nationalist in charge of the Mind Warriors. The stories are interwoven throughout the novel, and are used to develop themes of political and familial loyalty, as well as nationalism, and the role of personal relationships under extenuating circumstances. The novel uses speculative fiction to address real world historical and political questions. The relationship between the Kyzare's telepathic abilities and Yinitrium allows the speculative elements to function as metaphor, and mirrors Solonian attempts to weaponize Yinitrium. In this way, power is explored as a theme, as both groups use the element to exert control over the continent.
  • S.O.S. Eisberg versus S.O.S. Iceberg - two nations' visualizations of arctic landscapes

    Aloia, Kerstin Anne; Schell, Jennifer; Stanley, Sarah; Carr, Rich (2018-12)
    This project is a comparison of the perspectives on Arctic nature that are featured in the 1933 films S.O.S. Eisberg and S.O.S. Iceberg. I am arguing that the director of each version was influenced by his cultural background in visualizing the relationship between Arctic nature and the white explorers that encounter it in their films. Both Arnold Fanck, who created S.O.S. Eisberg, and Tay Garnett, who created S.O.S. Iceberg, worked with the same documentary footage that was filmed at Greenland's Arctic shores, but turned it into two different films. S.O.S. Eisberg turns the Arctic into a space whose hostile forces have to be confronted with the iron will of a leader who demands utmost loyalty from his followers, thus anticipating the leadership cult of the Nazi era. S.O.S. Iceberg portrays the Arctic as an alternative Western frontier that humans have to encounter as a collective who collaborates and facilitates a sense of community, which perpetuates the American self-identification as a frontier nation of explorers. Being aware of the backgrounds of these culture-specific visualizations not only explains the differences between the two films, but, on a larger scale, will teach us to understand the extend of the influence that our cultural background has on our understanding of and interaction with nature.
  • Author as ethnographer: The merging of genres in Raymond Carver's and Thomas Pynchon's texts

    Snyder, Megan Dawn; Bird, Roy K. (1999)
    Several of Raymond Carver's short stories and two of Thomas Pynchon's novels are analyzed for their ability to function as ethnography, through which they reveal the dominant and dominated codes in American culture. These texts were approached from an interdisciplinary stance, using theories and concepts from literary criticism, cultural anthropology, and sociology in order to interpret them with a greater degree of accuracy; because the text is treated as an ethnographic representation of a culture, it is possible to turn to it as the sole illustration of cultural elements and, in doing so, to be more open to addressing themes that the text explicates, rather than approaching the it with a preconceived agenda of what necessarily constructs American culture. By focusing in this manner on Carver's and Pynchon's texts as accounts of what is to be "American," it is possible to remain closer to what the texts portray and to avoid misreadings as well as misinterpretations of culture. Through these authors' representations of characters who defy mainstream cultural codes, the reader encounters in these authors' works what mainstream America finds most unsettling: characters who are not only alienated, but also aware of their status as outsiders and, more frequently than not, choose to embrace deviance in their self-definitions. Carver and Pynchon, when taken together, afford the reader with a vision of our culture that explores the dissociation and alienation that cuts through our society regardless of class or background. In their varying presentations of reality, they offer complementary views of distinct American subcultures that feature characters who are isolated and who generally denounce mainstream ideals. Conformist society is merely hinted at within the texts; its presence appears through its absence, characters' recognition of what they are denying, and what characters are denied. Both authors feature characters who identify aberrant behavior, for which rule-breaking individuals are labeled. Characters, once labeled, adopt secondary deviance and instigate a deviant career, from which the authors rarely permit a reprieve. The effect of labeling is the creation of a schism in the social fabric of American culture, which is characterized by the societal exclusion of individuals who do not uphold the dominant beliefs. American culture is also characterized by assimilation; as characters in Carvers and Pynchon's texts resist this process, they pose a threat to the social order, which is the prime factor in their labeling.
  • Shudder: Poems And Essays On Cancer, Care, And Healing

    Mohatt, Nathaniel Vincent; Burleson, Derick (2011)
    This book chronicles my journey in understanding and coming to terms with my father's illness and death. In 2005 he was diagnosed with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), and in 2008 I traveled with him to the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. In 2010 he died suddenly after his cancer transformed into an aggressive form of large cell lymphoma. The introductory personal essay ties together the trip to MD Anderson with writings from poetry and psychology, chronicling my experience with cancer care. The essay unveils an intimate relationship between art, the creation and experience of beauty, the provision of health care, and the meaning of healing. Like art, health care and healing are experienced in "the attempt," the process of trying to attain (health or beauty) without the ability to realize perfection. The poems weave together visions from the MD Anderson trip, other encounters with cancer, and pieces of my family's life after his death with a wide variety of images, memories, characters, and spirits. The poems begin with scenes and people from MD Anderson, then move to poems about coming into sense, discovery of the internal wild, and preparation for a time of sorrow. The later poems grapple with understanding the disease and my father's relationship with illness and conclude with in a continuation of "the attempt" even after death.
  • Margaret Keenan Harrais: A Biography In Four Voices

    Doetschman, Sarah; Carr, Richard (2011)
    Narrative strategies available to biography are explored through the life of Margaret Keenan Harrais---teacher, educational administrator, judge, and activist. Biography is a particular endeavor requiring flexible inquiry and creative presentation. Margaret is viewed through multiple lenses that explore personhood, encourage readers' introspection, and imply the importance of the individual in history. The four voices indicated in the title of this dissertation are editorial, analytical, sparsely Romantic, and expository. This biography aims to complicate readers' notions of what it means to be a person in relation to other people by focusing closely on selected episodes in Margaret's career; analyzing their historical, social, and literary import; and finally broadening the perspective to include the entirety of Margaret's life. The roles of the biographer and the reader are examined throughout in an attempt to explore the interconnections between biography and autobiography. Margaret's life is presented within the contexts of other women teachers in rural areas, as well as other men and women who wrote about territorial Alaska for a non-Alaskan audience. At heart this biography seeks to experiment with the narrative possibilities available to biographers, and to explore the ways in which the effects of these narratives allow for the contribution to general scholarship on the basis of particular experiences.
  • Inconstant Endeavors: The Elusiveness Of The Anti-Heroine

    Williamson, Lianne; Bird, Roy K.; Burleson, Derick; Coffman, Christine; Weiss, David; Vettel-Becker, Patricia (2009)
    The anti-heroine is a difficult woman to define. The intent of this project was to find the markers and signifiers for the character of the anti-heroine. Only recently, with modernism and then post-modernism, has the equation of beauty = woman started to change. What has occurred is the opposite, the grotesque. How are female artists using the grotesque to open up the possibilities for how women are allowed to act? Although women are now being allowed, in film, to DO what men do, i.e. kill people, they are still coming across in stereotypically female ways. The women are still beautiful, they use violence, they have to be more manly than men. How has second and third wave feminist theory opened up the realm of writing about the bitch? In the past decade literally thousands of books have been written with "bitch" in the title. Is the "bitch" the same thing as the anti-heroine? In the creative part of the dissertation, I have attempted to write a multi-faceted anti-heroine who isn't necessarily a bitch, doesn't participate in violence, has a sense of humor, and is writing about both female and feminist subjects. The critical essay looks at literary influences on my writing and my own definition of the anti-heroine. My research has shown that the anti-heroine is an extremely elusive character and is quite different from the male anti-hero. What we can say is that she defies stereotyping, is a complex creation, may or may not be beautiful, and acts rather than reacts.
  • A World Of Difference: Emma Wolf, A Jewish-American Writer On The American Frontier

    Mandel, Dena Toni Cooper; Schuldiner, Michael (2008)
    "A World of Difference: Emma Wolf, A Jewish-American Writer on the American Frontier" is the first dissertation to undertake a scholarly inquiry of Wolf's Jewish novels, Other Things Being Equal and Heirs of Yesterday. Emma Wolf (1865--1932) was a Jewish-American literary pioneer who interrogated prevailing models of late nineteenth-century femininity, Judaism, and bifurcated, Jewish-American identity. This study retrieves the fiction of this native Californian from the margins of both Jewish and American literature. At the close of the nineteenth century, nearly all interest in American-Jewish life focused on the Eastern European Jewish immigrants on the Lower East Side of New York City. Emma Wolf's fiction imparts a singular glimpse of a Western American enclave of Jewish life. Remarkably, Wolf's Jewish novels resist the prevailing patterns of assimilation espoused by most Jewish writers at the end of the century. Instead of abandoning culture, faith, and family, Wolf embraces Jewish particularity. The preservation of Jewish identity in Wolf's fiction is a consequence of her American birth, her California origins, and her conviction that Jewish difference is as important as American conformity. Other Things Being Equal (1892) scrutinizes the struggle of a young Jewish woman who wants to marry a Christian. In sanctioning intermarriage, the novel abrogates religious precepts and contravenes the customary marital patterns of Jewish women. The implications of intermarriage afford Wolf the opportunity to expand on issues of Jewish affirmation and Jewish difference. In Heirs of Yesterday (1900) Wolf examines divergent responses of Jewish-Americans to anti-Semitism. In order to protect himself from discrimination, Dr. Philip May hides his Jewish birth. Wolf suggests that Jews who are forgetful of their ethnic identity are as misguided as the segment of American society that discriminates against them. This study of Emma Wolf's Jewish novels concludes that we must take a new literary census, one that embraces minority writers, like Emma Wolf, in order to appreciate the pluralism of the American literary canon and the full panoply of the nation's cultural productivity.
  • Language Switching On English Compositions Of Latino Students In Alaska And Puerto Rico

    Jimenez-Lugo, Edna; Burleson, Derick (2007)
    The main objective of the research described in this dissertation was to explore how English second language (ESL) writers used their first language (L1) when composing in their second language (L2). This task was undertaken by identifying participants according to their L2 (English) proficiency level, Latino ethnic subgroup, and generational status. Another objective of this study was to better understand the writer's perspective regarding first language use in L2 writing, referred to as language-switching (L-S) in this study. Eight high school Latinos were recruited in Fairbanks, Alaska, and a group of twenty-three college-level participants in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. Participants were asked to complete a self-report questionnaire, provide a writing sample, and participate in a guided focus group discussion. Findings indicated that participants with low L2 proficiency were more likely to switch languages at the lexical level than participants at an intermediate or advanced level of English proficiency. Switching languages from English to Spanish at the lexical level was of no benefit for text coherence. Lack of L2 linguistic competence was a contributing factor for switching to the L1 as participants compensated for L2 difficulties with their L1 knowledge at the morphological, syntactical, and semantic level. A qualitative analysis of the focus group data suggests that thinking in the L1 is a common strategy for ESL learners, which they perceive to be an advantage for generating ideas faster and to decide what to write. However, participants' perceived writing text in the L1 for later content translation to be counterproductive. An important factor that cannot be discounted and that may have contributed to the language switching frequency among the participants in this study is the learning contexts: learning English in the U.S. versus learning English in Puerto Rico. Additional research is needed to explore the relationship between language switching and learning context. I conclude this dissertation by suggesting pedagogical implications regarding L2 writing instruction and for placement of L2 learners in ESL programs.
  • Cheechako Teacher: Narratives Of First -Year Teachers In Rural Alaska

    Carter, Stephen Ruben; Bird, Roy (2006)
    Seventy percent of teachers in rural Alaska come from the lower 48, most having little to no introduction to the culture they are entering or what will be asked of them as teachers. The turnover rate of teachers in rural Alaska far outstrips the national average; in some rural districts turnover is nearly 100 percent each year. This leads us to conclude that the first year of teaching in rural Alaska must be highly charged experience. Though many studies have been done on first-year teachers in rural Alaska, none has focused on the teachers' personal writings produced while in the midst of their experience. This study is a narrative inquiry into the first-person accounts of first-year teachers in rural Alaska from 1896 to 2006. The study constructs "plot points" (meaning events and tensions that drive the teachers' narratives) that delimit the structure of the average first-year Alaskan teacher story. The accounts are divided into two sections: historical accounts and contemporary accounts. Each of these sections is divided according to a series of plot points, namely: (1) the decision, (2) the arrival, (3) the first day of school, (4) collisions, (5) integration, and (6) effectiveness (historical section only), and (7) the final decision (contemporary teachers only). The study points out the similarities and contrasts between historical accounts and contemporary accounts and seeks to bring these into dialogue with Alaska-specific pedagogical theories. The study concludes that the utility of first year teachers' writings is not derived from their prescriptions, but their descriptions. Thus, the study recommends (1) that more first-person written narratives be gathered from first-year teachers in rural Alaska to facilitate a more in depth study, (2) that new teachers in Alaska avail themselves of the written narratives of their professional forebears, (3) that Alaska's public education system create room for first-year teachers to tell their stories in non judgmental settings, and (4) that future study also focus on perceptions of first-year teachers by their students and village.
  • Leaving Centralia and other stories

    Small, Sarah; Brightwell, Geri; Kamerling, Leonard; Harney, Eileen (2018-05)
    In the eight short stories within this collection, we encounter characters against a variety of backdrops, from the mundane--middle school shop class, and a short road trip--to the more bizarre--a town with an underground fire predicted to burn for two hundred years, and a forbidden island potter's field. Many of the protagonists are adolescents, positioned between their childhood, when they played a more passive role in their own lives, and adulthood, when they more deliberately make decisions about their own actions and lives. However, in all of these settings and regardless of age, the characters find that it is not under exceptional circumstances but through the course of the ordinary moments in their daily lives that they encounter testing points for their maturity and integrity.
  • Plastic Alaska

    Namey, Jason; Brightwell, Gerri; Mellen, Kyle; Carr, Rich (2018-05)
    The stories in Plastic Alaska depict characters losing--often literally--their own identities. Whether it be a young boy who believes that an Alaskan theme park ride transformed him into a different person, or a woman who finds herself compulsively imagining murdering her husband after watching a Terrence Malick film, or a desperate man who assumes the identity of his former best friend so he can get a job on a reality TV show, these characters find themselves thrown--sometimes reluctantly, sometimes willingly--into situations where they must leave their former selves behind just to survive the unwelcome intrusions of an absurd, demanding reality. Plastic Alaska shows--in worlds that range from the real to the fantastical--the dread, uneasiness, and occasional joy that accompanies metamorphosis.
  • "Skin-tongue"

    Mckisick, Kendalyn; Johnson, Sara; Coffman, Chris; Mellen, Kyle; Hirsch, Alexander (2018-05)
    This thesis is first and foremost a poetry project. However, central to its craft are ideas of cross-genre poetics. Thematically interconnected essays of both lyric and experimental styles are used as section breaks, which provides more clarity while simultaneously heightening complexity as the manuscript progresses. The sequencing of the essays and poems have a personal chronological trajectory, beginning with more concrete imagery and standard grammar usage then progressing towards a more abstract landscape where repeated images are transformed through experimental grammar usage and varied contexts. Image matching on either side of the manuscript acts as connective tissue holding the two "halves" together, whereas the language and presentation in the first half allow the reader an anchor to move forward into a more strange and untethered space towards the end. The language found in the essays has range influenced by the voice of the speakers. These voices include the child voice, the instructional scientific, to arguably fictional because of an unreliable narrator. These same voices can be found within the poems. Through adherence to intuitive sound and rhythm, including line and section breaks, anaphora, internal rhyme, and fragmentation, the essays maintain a poetic quality. These two elements of craft place the essays in direct conversation with the poems that surround them. Thematically, the project deals with racial tensions, motherhood, and romantic relationships through a discovery of the personal skin--its birth, its color, and its ability to perceive and be perceived.
  • Recreation

    Alfaro, Alex; Johnson, Sara Eliza; Reilly, Terence; Brightwell, Gerri (2018-05)
    This collection was the result of a "happy accident" which occured while watching late night tv and writing poetry. It felt odd at the time to be doing something so mundane and contemporary while also creating something as ancient and steeped in culture and tradition. My life has always seemed varied, almost random, and that's the basic premise of this collection. From such randomness do these poems find purpose: from absurdity comes destiny, from insignificance comes enlightenment and everything in between is a just a privilege--but art, that's where this collection can live.

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