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dc.contributor.authorWoods, Ashley
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-30T01:00:29Z
dc.date.available2018-11-30T01:00:29Z
dc.date.issued2018-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/9694
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2018en_US
dc.description.abstractNative Americans have experienced a number of historically traumatic events that are believed to contribute to the development of behavioral health symptoms that negatively affect Native American quality of life across generations. Despite the trajectory of trauma experienced in some Native American communities, Native Americans exhibit extraordinary resilience and cultural strengths. Stress and coping models have been developed to explain how historical trauma is related to current health disparities among Native Americans and how enculturation may serve as a buffer against the negative effects of historical trauma. However, these models apply meta-theories to understanding historical trauma rather than tribally specific conceptualizations of historical trauma and historical trauma responses. Therefore, it is important to understand tribally specific manifestations of historical trauma so that intervention and prevention efforts are culturally appropriate. Choctaws are one of the largest Native American groups in the United States. They have experienced a history of forced removal and relocation from traditional homelands, yet the Choctaw Nation itself exhibits continuous growth and success as a tribe. This study used a qualitative, phenomenological, and community based participatory research (CBPR) approach to explore how Oklahoma Choctaw American Indians experience historical trauma and define well-being and enculturation. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with Choctaw American Indians in three different age categories 18-29; 30-49; and 50 and over to examine generational differences in how concepts of historical trauma, enculturation, and well-being are conceptualized. The theoretical construct of historical trauma was informed by themes of assimilation and colonization; resurgence of the Choctaw identity; awareness of historical losses and affective responses; forms of coping; current barriers to accessing Choctaw Nation services; and varying degrees of cultural involvement among tribal members. The theoretical construct of well-being was described in terms of physical health, faith, family, and culture. The theoretical construct of enculturation included pride in heritage, having Choctaw blood, being involved, and social connectedness. Choctaw participants reported social problems related to substance abuse and a sense of diminishing social connectedness to other tribal members. Recommendations on how to upscale behavioral health treatment and strengthen community ties are described. Adapted measures of historical trauma and enculturation for use in future research endeavors with Oklahoma Choctaw American Indians are also provided.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectChoctaw Indiansen_US
dc.subjectMental health servicesen_US
dc.subjectOklahomaen_US
dc.subjectHealth and hygieneen_US
dc.subjectColonizationen_US
dc.subjectCultural assimilationen_US
dc.subjectEthnic identityen_US
dc.titleHistorical trauma and approaches to healing among Choctaw American Indiansen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.type.degreephden_US
dc.identifier.departmentClinical-Community Psychologyen_US
dc.contributor.chairRivkin, Inna
dc.contributor.committeeGifford, Valerie
dc.contributor.committeeLardon, Ce'cile
dc.contributor.committeeDavid, E.J.R.


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