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dc.contributor.authorIrwin, Don L.
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-07T02:25:22Z
dc.date.available2018-12-07T02:25:22Z
dc.date.issued1945-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/9703
dc.description.abstractAs early as 1898 investigations of the agricultural possibilities in Alaska were begun along the southern coast and westward along the Aleutian Islands. In the reports of these investigations frequent reference is made to the variety and abundance of the native grasses, whose value for hay and ensilage in feeding livestock was well-known even .at that early date. In some districts, as many as 40 varieties and species were found. Letters written in the same year from widely-scattered points throughout the Territory indicate that the native grasses were widely disseminated, flourishing as far north as the Yukon River. As a family, the legumes native to Alaska, while widely disseminated, are not so predominant as the grasses. In some small areas they are quite abundant. In other sections, only a few varieties are found in scattered locations. As a whole, they form only a small proportion of the forage plants of the Territory. In their native habitat, the grasses and legumes bear seed and propagate readily. Under cultivated conditions, however, considerable difficulty has been encountered in germinating seed of either the native grasses or legumes successfully. It has been found that close grazing or mowing for hay or ensilage year after year depletes the stand of the grasses and legumes. Also, the period during which the native grasses may be pastured or cut for hay with maximum yield and nutritive value is short. For these reasons, the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Alaska have given considerable attention to studies and trials of cultivated varieties of grasses and legumes for pasture and hay. The experimental data on the grasses and legumes tried at the several Stations are briefly summarized in the following report, giving the variety of grass and legume, the years it was seeded, and the results. No attempt has been made to include detail. Scientific names have been eliminated as much as possible, except where they are necessary for definite identification. Varieties of grasses and legumes best adapted to each section of Alaska are listed in the Summary on Page 42.en_US
dc.description.tableofcontentsIntroduction -- Sitka Station -- Kenai Station -- Rampart Station -- Copper Center Station -- Fairbanks Station -- Kodiak Station -- Matanuska Station -- Grasses: General Description -- Comparative Table of Wild and Tame Grasses -- Grasses suitable for hay and pasture -- legumes -- Grass and legume seed mixtures for hay and pasture -- Seed bed preparation and seeding -- Harvesting the crop -- Summary -- Bibliography -- Indexen_US
dc.publisherAgricultural Experiment Stations, University of Alaskaen_US
dc.subjectGrassesen_US
dc.subjectLegumesen_US
dc.subjectAlaskaen_US
dc.titleForty-seven years of experimental work with grasses and legumes in Alaskaen_US
dc.title.alternativeBulletin 12en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-06T01:33:22Z


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