• Blocking a wave: frequency band gaps in ice shelves with periodic crevasses

      Freed-Brown, Julian; Amundson, Jason M.; MacAyeal, Douglas R.; Zhang, Wendy W. (International Glaciological Society, 2012)
      We assess how the propagation of high-frequency elastic-flexural waves through an ice shelf is modified by the presence of spatially periodic crevasses. Analysis of the normal modes supported by the ice shelf with and without crevasses reveals that a periodic crevasse distribution qualitatively changes the mechanical response. The normal modes of an ice shelf free of crevasses are evenly distributed as a function of frequency. In contrast, the normal modes of a crevasse-ridden ice shelf are distributed unevenly. There are ‘band gaps’, frequency ranges over which no eigenmodes exist. A model ice shelf that is 50 km in lateral extent and 300 m thick with crevasses spaced 500 m apart has a band gap from 0.2 to 0.38 Hz. This is a frequency range relevant for ocean-wave/ice-shelf interactions. When the outermost edge of the crevassed ice shelf is oscillated at a frequency within the band gap, the ice shelf responds very differently from a crevasse-free ice shelf. The flexural motion of the crevassed ice shelf is confined to a small region near the outermost edge of the ice shelf and effectively ‘blocked’ from reaching the interior.
    • A computational investigation of iceberg capsize as a driver of explosive ice-shelf disintegration.

      Amundson, Jason M.; Guttenberg, Nicolas; Abbott, Dorian S.; Burton, Justin C.; Cathles, L. M.; Macayeal, Douglas R.; Zhang, Wendy W. (International Glaciology Society, 2011)
      Potential energy released from the capsize of ice-shelf fragments (icebergs) is the immediate driver of the brief explosive phase of ice-shelf disintegration along the Antarctic Peninsula (e.g. the Larsen A, Larsen B and Wilkins ice shelves). The majority of this energy powers the rapidly expanding plume of ice-shelf fragments that expands outward into the open ocean; a smaller fraction of this energy goes into surface gravity waves and other dynamic interactions between ice and water that can sustain the continued fragmentation and break-up of the original ice shelf. As an initial approach to the investigation of ice-shelf fragment capsize in ice-shelf collapse, we develop a simple conceptual model involving ideal rectangular icebergs, initially in unstable or metastable orientations, which are assembled into a tightly packed mass that subsequently disassembles via massed capsize. Computations based on this conceptual model display phenomenological similarity to aspects of real ice-shelf collapse. A promising result of the conceptual model presented here is a description of how iceberg aspect ratio and its statistical variance, the two parameters related to ice-shelf fracture patterns, influence the enabling conditions to be satisfied by slow-acting processes (e.g. environmentally driven melting) that facilitate ice-shelf disintegration.
    • Dynamic jamming of iceberg-choked fjords

      Peters, Ivo R.; Amundson, Jason M.; Cassotto, Ryan; Fahnestock, Mark; Darnell, Kristopher N.; Truffer, Martin; Zhang, Wendy W. (American Geophysical Union, 2015-02-02)
      We investigate the dynamics of ice mélange by analyzing rapid motion recorded by a time-lapse camera and terrestrial radar during several calving events that occurred at Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland. During calving events (1) the kinetic energy of the ice mélange is 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the total energy released during the events, (2) a jamming front propagates through the ice mélange at a rate that is an order of magnitude faster than the motion of individual icebergs, (3) the ice mélange undergoes initial compaction followed by slow relaxation and extension, and (4) motion of the ice mélange gradually decays before coming to an abrupt halt. These observations indicate that the ice mélange experiences widespread jamming during calving events and is always close to being in a jammed state during periods of terminus quiescence. We therefore suspect that local jamming influences longer timescale ice mélange dynamics and stress transmission.
    • The influence of ice melange on fjord seiches

      MacAyeal, Douglas R.; Freed-Brown, Julian; Zhang, Wendy W.; Amundson, Jason M. (International Glaciological Society, 2012)
      We compute the eigenmodes (seiches) of the barotropic and baroclinic hydrodynamic equations for an idealized fjord having length and depth scales similar to those of Ilulissat Icefjord, Greenland, into which Jakobshavn Isbræ (also known as Sermeq Kujalleq) discharges. The purpose of the computation is to determine the fjord’s seiche behavior when forced by iceberg calving, capsize and melange movement. Poorly constrained bathymetry and stratification details are an acknowledged obstacle. We are, nevertheless, able to make general statements about the spectra of external and internal seiches using numerical simulations of ideal one-dimensional channel geometry. Of particular signifi- cance in our computation is the role of weakly coupled ice melange, which we idealize as a simple array of 20 icebergs of uniform dimensions equally spaced within the fjord. We find that the presence of these icebergs acts to (1) slow down the propagation of both external and internal seiches and (2) introduce band gaps where energy propagation (group velocity) vanishes. If energy is introduced into the fjord within the period range covered by a band gap, it will remain trapped as an evanescent oscillatory mode near its source, thus contributing to localized energy dissipation and ice/melange fragmentation.