• Investigation of strongly ducted infrasonic dispersion using a vertical eigenfunction expansion of the Helmholtz equation in a modal broad band acoustic propagation code

      Edon, Robert Alexander; Olson, John V.; Fee, David E.; Szuberla, Curt A. (2015-12)
      This study investigates an infrasound propagation model created by the National Center for Physical Acoustics (NCPA) which is applied to atmospheric data with a strong temperature inversion in the lower atmosphere. This temperature inversion is believed to be the primary cause of a dispersed infrasonic signal recorded by an infrasound sensor array located on the Southern California coast in August, 2012. The received signal is characterized by initial low frequency content followed by a high frequency content tail. It is shown the NCPA model is hindered by limited atmospheric data and no ground truth for the source function which generated the received signal. The results of the NCPA model are shown to not reproduce the recorded signal and provide inconclusive evidence for infrasonic dispersion.
    • NCPA propagation code users manual

      Winkelman, Andrew T.; Szuberla, Curt A.; Fee, David E.; Olson, John V. (2015-12)
      This manual was written for University of Alaska Fairbanks infrasound group to assist researchers in using the National Center for Physical Acoustics (NCPA) code suite to further investigate observed infrasonic phenomena. The NCPA code suite is designed to simulate various aspects of infrasound propagation through a model atmosphere. This suite was developed and tested by the University of Mississippi National Center for Physical Acoustics infrasound group. Included are raytrace routines to initially establish signal paths, both single frequency and broadband modal routines to calculate pressure fields and transmission losses, and a parabolic method to calculate pressure fields and transmission losses in model atmospheres.
    • Studying auroral microphysics using multiple optically tracked rocket sub-payloads

      Vann, Joshua M.; Conde, Mark; Delamere, Peter; Hampton, Donald (2018-12)
      There is insufficient knowledge of scale length parameters associated with ionospheric plasma structures. Using a novel technique combining rocket-based instrument data with ground-based optical and instrumental data measurements, ISINGLASS attempts to determine the spatial scale lengths over which parameter differences in auroral arcs present in the upper ionosphere. Determination of such scale lengths has the propensity to strengthen preexisting models of magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions. While analysis is not complete and the extent of such scale lengths is still unknown, after completion of the experiment phase of the mission, differences in measurements have been found that cannot be accounted for through experimental error. This shows the existence of a critical scale length within the distances measured, and the techniques used present a reliable method with which to launch a future campaign.