• Crustal Deformation Along The San Andreas Fault And Within The Tibetan Plateau Measured Using Gps

      Chen, Qizhi; Freymueller, Jeffrey T. (2002)
      Using the Global Positioning System (GPS), we study crustal deformation along the San Andreas Fault (SAF) in the San Francisco Bay area and within the Tibetan Plateau, and provide new constraints for the kinematics of these actively deforming plate boundaries. GPS measurements in 1996 and 1997 and Electronic Distance Measuring (EDM) data from the 1970s and 1980s at sites along the SAF in northern California were used to determine the near-fault strain rate and to investigate the slip rate, locking depth, and rheology. We found a pronounced high near-fault shear strain rate that can be explained by a 2-D inhomogeneous model in which a low-rigidity compliant zone concentrates strain near the fault. We suggest that the materials on either side of the fault and the cumulative fault offset play a role in the development of the compliant zone. If such a compliant zone is present but unmodeled, the geodetic estimates of slip rate and locking depth (seismogenic depth) would be biased. This would lead to a miscalculated seismic hazard. Thirteen GPS sites in southern Tibet, surveyed in 1995, 1998 and 2000, were merged with other data from China and Nepal into a single, self-consistent velocity field. The Himalaya and southern Tibet was modeled using a kinematically-consistent block model and elastic dislocation theory. We show a significantly lower convergence rate between India and Eurasia in central Himalaya than that previously estimated. We observe that southern Tibet undergoes non-uniform (spatial) east-west extension with one-half of the extension across the Yadong-Gulu rift. We infer that spatially non-uniform extension in southern Tibet results in variation of the arc-normal convergence rates along the Himalaya, and that the Yarlung-Zangbo suture or adjacent structure may be active as a right-lateral strike slip fault. From 44 GPS sites in the Tibetan Plateau, we show that deformation of Tibet is distributed and strain accumulation is spatially uniform across the entire plateau. We propose a kinematic model for the Tibetan Plateau to be a combination of rigid block motion, pure shear and uniaxial contraction in the direction of about N32�E, comparable to the convergence direction between India and Eurasia.
    • Deformation Of Alaskan Volcanoes Measured Using Sar Interferometry And Gps

      Mann, Doerte; Freymueller, Jeffrey (2002)
      Geodetic measurements using the Global Positioning System (GPS) and synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) show deformation of Okmok, Westdahl, and Fisher volcanoes in the Alaska-Aleutian arc. This thesis shows the variety of deformation signals observed, presents models for the observations, and interprets them in terms of underlying processes. InSAR data show deflation of Okmok caldera during its last eruption in 1997, preceded and followed by inflation of smaller magnitude. Modeling shows that the main deformation source, interpreted as a central magma reservoir, is located at 2.5 to 5.0 km depth beneath the approximate center of the caldera, and 5 km away from the active vent. Mass balance calculations and comparison with the long-term eruptive frequency indicate that Okmok may be supplied with magma continuously from a deep source. GPS measurements between 1998 and 2001 show inflation of Westdahl volcano, with a source located about 7 km beneath the summit. The combined subsurface volume increase measured during the GPS and an earlier InSAR observation period [Lu et al., 2000a] accounts for at least 15% more than the volume erupted from Westdahl in 1991--92, suggesting that an eruption of that size could occur at any time. Neighboring Fisher caldera shows subsidence and contraction across the caldera center that is not related to any eruptive activity. The main mechanisms to explain this deformation are degassing and contractional cooling of a shallow magma body, or depressurization of Fisher's hydrothermal system, possibly triggered by an earthquake in the vicinity of the caldera in 1999. A systematic coherence analysis of SAR interferograms documents the cooling history of the 1997 Okmok lava flow. The flow is incoherent directly after emplacement, but coherence increases as more time has passed since the eruption, and also the shorter the period spanned by the interferogram. Coherence is regained three years after the eruption. This corresponds to the time when the 20 m thick flow has solidified, indicating that flow mobility is the dominant factor degrading coherence on young lava flows. Based on these results, InSAR coherence analysis can be used to derive the minimum thickness of a lava flow.