• Benzene and toluene mixing ratios in indoor air of homes with attached garages and measurement of respective biomarkers of exposure and ventilation effects

      Isbell, Maggie Ann; Duffy, Larry (2000)
      Benzene and toluene mixing ratios were measured in the indoor air of homes with attached garages for several seasons using a thermal desorption GC-FID sampling and analysis protocol (EPA T0-17). Benzene in the living area of these homes ranged from 1--72 ppbv and toluene ranged 3--111 ppbv. The garage levels of benzene ranged from 8--304 pbbv and the toluene levels ranged from 14--591 ppbv. Numerous experiments and a model support the hypothesis of a single source of toluene and benzene. Source strength estimate calculations supported the hypothesis that gasoline in the attached garage is the primary source of these compounds in living area air. They also showed that the home with the air-to-air heat exchangers and forced ventilation had less transport of aromatics than an unventilated home. Perturbation experiments showed that a metal gas can filled with gasoline in the garage and an indoor window open were important factors for benzene and toluene levels in the living areas of the homes. For most experiments, weighted regression analyses of toluene and benzene mixing ratios were consistent with a sole source. Finally, no correlation was observed between the levels of benzene and toluene measured in living areas and their respective urinary biomarkers: t,t-MA and hippuric acid.