• 1982 Conference on Violence

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1982-10-11)
      The 1982 Conference on Violence, sponsored by the Justice Center at University of Alaska Anchorage, was held October 11–13, 1982 at the Hotel Captain Cook in Anchorage. The conference was organized around five central themes: violent people, victims of violence, methods of preventing and controlling violence, firearms and violence, and research and public policy concerning violence.
    • Barrow

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1979)
      This unpublished manuscript discusses police, judicial practices, and alcohol control in Barrow and the North Slope Borough of Alaska in the 1970s, and compares outpatient accident trends in Barrow and Bethel and their implications for protective custody laws. Community solutions to alcohol control in an area village, discussed under the pseudonym “Fishnet," are also described.
    • A Basic Police Communications and Records System: Student Manual for the Police Communications and Records Program

      Angell, John E. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1980)
      This student manual describes the basic structure of a sound police communications and records system, covering organization; files, forms, and procedures; property control records; and records retention and destruction.
    • Book Review of Village Journey by Thomas R. Berger

      Conn, Stephen (1985-09)
      This article reviews Village Journey: The Report of the Alaska Native Review Commission by Thomas R. Berger (New York: Hill and Wang, 1985). The Alaska Native Review Commission, headed by former Canadian parliamentarian and justice Thomas Berger, initiated an inquiry into the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) in 1984, visiting 62 villages and hearing 1600 residents to determine ANCSA's impact on Alaska Native lands and communities. Berger found that ANCSA had placed Native land at risk, endangering not only its title but the rights of Alaska Natives to subsist upon it.
    • The Complexity of Crime

      Angell, John E. (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1977-11)
      Although fictional representations of crime depicted in TV shows, movies, and other popular media tend to be simplistic and unrealistic, these portrayals shape much of the American conventional wisdom about crime. This article contrasts fictional depictions of crime and criminals with how criminality actually is seen in society, what causes it, and how it can be addressed.
    • The Correctional Master Plan: Some Legislative Options

      Endell, Roger V. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1979-11-30)
      This testimony before the House Judiciary Committee of the Alaska State Legislature lays out potential future scenarios for corrections in Alaska. The author urges legislators to pay attention to the results of over half a million dollars worth of research on correctional problems in Alaska over the past three years in its decisionmaking on how to implement recommendations of the Alaska Corrections Master Plan.
    • Courts and Trials: Teacher's Manual

      Balnave, Richard; Anchorage School District (Anchorage School District; Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-08)
      In 1976, Anchorage School District (ASD) and the Criminal Justice Center at University of Alaska, Anchorage, collaborated to develop a law-related curriculum for 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th-grade classrooms, with teacher's manuals written to supplement the basic texts chosen for the program, the "Law in Action" series by Linda Riekes and Sally Mahe Ackerly (West Publishing Company, 1975). This teacher's manual for the unit taught to seventh-graders, ""Courts and Trials," focuses on the judicial system in America and in Alaska. The teacher's manual reflects improvements to the original lessons, supplementary classroom activities, supplementary media, and inclusion of Alaska-specific content such as local news articles about Alaska courts and Alaska community resources. Supplementary material in this teacher's manual does not cover every lesson in the original "Law in Action" unit.
    • An Exploratory Study of Changes Accompanying the Implementation of a Community-Based, Participatory Team Police Organizational Model

      Angell, John E. (Michigan State University, 1975)
      This exploratory research examines the attitudes of citizens, police clientele, and police in an area where a decentralized, participatory (collegial) team police operation has been implemented, and compares these attitudes with those in a similar neighborhood policed by a classical organizational structure and traditional procedures. The Team Police Model of this study consisted basically of 15 generalist police officers who, with the participation of local citizens, were responsible for defining police goals, priorities and procedures and providing all police services in a precisely defined, low-economic, minority, residential area of Holyoke, Massachusetts for a test period of approximately nine months. The Team used collegial methods for decisionmaking and task forces for performing management functions. The Team followed a "service", rather than "law enforcement" operational philosophy. The control neighborhood was policed by an organization arrangement which was in general consistent with Classical tenets as stated by Max Weber. A traditional "law enforcement" philosophy was used in the Classical neighborhood. The basic assumption underlying this study was police effectiveness in crime prevention and order maintenance is dependent on a supportive public. The primary problem researched was whether public and clientele attitudes toward the police were more supportive in the Team Police than a Classical Police area. Of secondary concern was the impact of the Team Police experiment on police officers attitudes. Perhaps the most important conclusion to be derived from this study is that, contrary to conventional wisdom, the collegial Team Police Model as implemented in this project did not have a negative impact on any variable investigated. The positive impact of the project on most variables supports the value of further research with a community-based, collegial team organizational structure for police services.
    • Finland v. the USA: Imprisonment Responses to Crime

      Endell, Roger V. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1981-10-20)
      This manuscript, prepared as a chapter for a prospective book on corrections and punishment in the Scandinavian/Nordic nations of northern Europe, compares Finland with the United States with respect to the imprisonment response to crime, correctional policies, and correctional populations.
    • Interview with Victor C. Krumm

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-10-28)
      Victor C. Krumm, district attorney in Bethel, Alaska from 1976 to 1979, was interviewed on October 28, 1978 about the numerous difficulties in enforcing state liquor laws and local liquor ordinances in Bethel and the villages of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta in southwestern Alaska. According to Krumm, the authority villages formerly held to solve their own conflicts was removed due to constitutional rights guarantees, but gaps in the law and insufficient judicial and law enforcement resources in the bush leave villages without the ability to preserve social order.
    • Interview with William R. Nix

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1973)
      William R. Nix, magistrate supervisor with the Alaska Court System and former an Alaska State Trooper, was interviewed in 1973 about law enforcement in bush Alaska during the early years of Alaska statehood; the relationships between Alaska State Troopers, village councils, magisrates of the Alaska Court System, and district attorneys in regional hubs; bail decisions for accused offenders; and the difficulties of establishing and maintaining a fair and equitable justice system in the predominately Alaska Native villages of rural Alaska.
    • Introducing New Criteria for Assessing Training Materials About the Elderly

      Johnson, Knowlton W.; Beirnard, Charles A.; Stiles, Stephen R. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1981-11)
      In what ways do law enforcement personnel and agencies use knowledge about the elderly? This article presents the findings of a recent study conducted by the International Training Research and Evaluation Council on how law enforcement trainees make use of the knowledge they gained through training materials developed by the National Retired Teachers Association/American Association of Retired Persons.
    • Juvenile Problems and the Law: Teacher's Manual

      Balnave, Richard; Anchorage School District (Anchorage School District; Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-08)
      In 1976, Anchorage School District (ASD) and the Criminal Justice Center at University of Alaska, Anchorage, collaborated to develop a law-related curriculum for 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th-grade classrooms, with teacher's manuals written to supplement the basic texts chosen for the program, the "Law in Action" series by Linda Riekes and Sally Mahe Ackerly (West Publishing Company, 1975). This teacher's manual for the unit taught to eighth-graders, "Juvenile Problems and the Law," focuses on the legal aspects of juvenile delinquency and contains information regarding "helping" agencies. The teacher's manual reflects improvements to the original lessons, supplementary classroom activities, supplementary media, and inclusion of Alaska-specific content such as Alaska laws and Alaska community resources. Supplementary material in this teacher's manual does not cover every lesson in the original "Law in Action" unit.
    • Lawmaking: Teacher's Manual

      Balnave, Richard; Anchorage School District (Anchorage School District; Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-08)
      In 1976, Anchorage School District (ASD) and the Criminal Justice Center at University of Alaska, Anchorage, collaborated to develop a law-related curriculum for 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th-grade classrooms, with teacher's manuals written to supplement the basic texts chosen for the program, the "Law in Action" series by Linda Riekes and Sally Mahe Ackerly (West Publishing Company, 1975). This teacher's manual for the unit taught to fifth-graders, "Lawmaking," focuses on how our laws are made. The teacher's manual reflects improvements to the original lessons, supplementary classroom activities, supplementary media, and inclusion of Alaska-specific content such as information about the Alaska Legislature and other legal bodies in Alaska, the steps in the passage of a law in Alaska, and Alaska community resources. Supplementary material in this teacher's manual does not cover every lesson in the original "Law in Action" unit.
    • Satellite Villages: Bethel and State Liquor Policy in the Modern Era

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1979)
      When representatives of eleven villages in the 57-village Bethel region met in Bethel on September 19, 1962, to organize what came to be the Association of Village Council Presidents, they also discussed the interplay between state law and traditional social control meted out by village councils as they dealt with liquor-related problems. This paper examines the breakdown of the working relationship between official Alaska law and village social control in the 1960s and its impact on village law and the role of town liquor policy and town police and treatment resources on alcohol-related violence in the villages in the 1970s.
    • Youth Attitudes and the Police: Teacher's Manual

      Balnave, Richard; Anchorage School District (Anchorage School District; Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-08)
      In 1976, Anchorage School District (ASD) and the Criminal Justice Center at University of Alaska, Anchorage, collaborated to develop a law-related curriculum for 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th-grade classrooms, with teacher's manuals written to supplement the basic texts chosen for the program, the "Law in Action" series by Linda Riekes and Sally Mahe Ackerly (West Publishing Company, 1975). This teacher's manual for the unit taught to sixth-graders, ""Youth Attitudes and the Police," focuses on the work and responsibilities of police officers, and their relationships with kids. The teacher's manual reflects improvements to the original lessons, supplementary classroom activities, supplementary media, and inclusion of Alaska-specific content such as local newspaper stories about police and Alaska community resources. Supplementary material in this teacher's manual does not cover every lesson in the original "Law in Action" unit.