Now showing items 1-20 of 8787

    • Rapid submarine melting driven by subglacial discharge, LeConte Glacier, Alaska

      Motyka, R. J.; Dryer, William P.; Amundson, Jason; Truffer, Martin; Fahnestock, Mark (American Geophysical Union, 2013-09-27)
      We show that subglacial freshwater discharge is the principal process driving high rates of submarine melting at tidewater glaciers. This buoyant discharge draws in warm seawater, entraining it in a turbulent upwelling flow along the submarine face that melts glacier ice. To capture the effects of subglacial discharge on submarine melting, we conducted 4 days of hydrographic transects during late summer 2012 at LeConte Glacier, Alaska. A major rainstorm allowed us to document the influence of large changes in subglacial discharge. We found strong submarine melt fluxes that increased from 9.1 ± 1.0 to 16.8 ± 1.3 m d1 (ice face equivalent frontal ablation) as a result of the rainstorm. With projected continued global warming and increased glacial runoff, our results highlight the direct impact that increases in subglacial discharge will have on tidewater outlet systems. These effects must be considered when modeling glacier response to future warming and increased runoff.
    • What does the future hold for Alaska: Fiscal Planning in the face of uncertainty

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-02-01)
    • Bycatch Avoidance Under Amendment 80 in the BSAI Non-Pollock Groundfish Trawl Fishery

      Haynie, Alan; Abbott, Joshua; Reimer, Matthew (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-05-01)
    • ACES High or Low? The Impact of a Severance Tax Change on Alaskan Oil Activity

      Tanaka, Audrey; Reimer, Matthew; Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-02-01)
    • Technology or Incentives? Bycatch Avoidance in the BSAI Groundfish Fishery

      Abbott, Joshua; Wilen, Jim; Reimer, Matthew (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-05-01)
    • Seizing Opportunities for Energy Efficiency: How Are we Doing

      Colt, Steve (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-05-01)
    • COVID-19's spring 2020 school closures: The effect on teacher candidates

      DeFeo, Dayna; Tran, Trang (Institute of Social and Economic Research, 2020-06-30)
      In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Governor Dunleavy mandated that Alaska’s K12 schools closed to in-person instruction; later, these school closures were extended until the end of the 2019-2020 academic year. Across the state, educators worked not only to ensure they met their responsibilities for instruction, but also other key school functions including parent resources, meal services, and social-emotional learning. Concurrently, senior college students in teacher licensure programs at the University of Alaska (UA) were in classrooms fulfilling their clinical experience (student teaching) requirements. During the school closures, students were still “placed” in schools, but the nature of their internship experience changed fundamentally as classes were moved to distance delivery. On March 20, Alaska’s Education Commissioner Michael Johnson announced that the state of Alaska would grant emergency certification to teachers who were unable to complete the required number of clinical placement hours due to COVID-19 school closures. Many of these new graduates will qualify for licensure, but how will the pandemic affect them as they become teachers? In this paper, we explore how teacher candidates perceive their readiness for teaching in the fall, and their career intentions. By comparing survey responses collected from spring 2020 graduates against graduates of spring 2019 (the students who had a “typical” student teaching experience), we find that the 2020 graduating class feels ready for the classroom. However, these new teachers – and those hired from teacher education programs (TEPs) outside of Alaska – will need supports as they transition to teaching.
    • In-State Gas Demand Study

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-01-01)
    • Salary & Benefits Schedule and Teacher Tenure Study

      Berman, Matthew; Hill, Alexandra; Hirshberg, Diane; DeFeo, Dayna (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-11-01)
    • ACES vs MAPA (SB21): Revenues and Jobs

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 6/1/2014)
    • Will they stay, or will they go? Teacher perceptions of working conditions in rural Alaska

      Hill, Alexandra; Hirshberg, Diane; Kasemodel, Craig (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 6/1/2014)
    • Alaska Teacher Turnover, Supply, and Demand: 2013 Highlights

      Hill, Alexandra; Hirshberg, Dian (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 6/1/2013)
    • Alaska career pathways: A baseline analysis

      Hirshberg, Diane; DeFeo, Dayna (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 6/1/2014)
    • Quality Teacher Evaluation in Alaska: Voices from the Field

      Laster, Martin (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 10/1/2013)
    • Alternative Certification: A Research Brief

      Hirshberg, Diane (Center for Alaska Education Policy Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 10/1/2011)
    • Preventive Screenings Gap Analysis

      Frazier, Rosyland; Guettabi, Mouhcine; Wheeler, John; Cueva, Katie (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-10-01)
    • PEDESTRIAN TRAVEL-TIME MAPS FOR WHITTIER, ALASKA: An anisotropic model to support tsunami evacuation planning

      Gardine, Lea; Nicolsky, Dmitry (2019-05)
      Tsunami-induced pedestrian evacuation for the community of Whittier is evaluated using an anisotropic modeling approach developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The method is based on path-distance algorithms and accounts for variations in land cover and directionality in the slope of terrain. We model evacuation of pedestrians to exit points from the tsunami hazard zone boundary. The pedestrian travel is restricted to the roads only. Results presented here are intended to provide guidance to local emergency management agencies for tsunami inundation assessment, evacuation planning, and public education to mitigate future tsunami hazards.
    • PEDESTRIAN TRAVEL-TIME MAPS FOR SITKA, ALASKA: An anisotropic model to support tsunami evacuation planning

      Macpherson, Amy; Gardine, Lea; Nicolsky, Dmitry (2020-06)
      Tsunami-induced pedestrian evacuation for Sitka is evaluated using an anisotropic modeling approach developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The method is based on path-distance algorithms and accounts for variations in land cover and directionality in the slope of terrain. We model evacuation of pedestrians to exit points from the tsunami hazard zone. The pedestrian travel is restricted to the roads only. Results presented here are intended to provide guidance to local emergency management agencies for tsunami inundation assessment, evacuation planning, and public education to mitigate future tsunami hazards.
    • PEDESTRIAN TRAVEL-TIME MAPS FOR PERRYVILLE, ALASKA: An anisotropic model to support tsunami evacuation planning

      Gardine, Lea; Nicolsky, Dmitry (2019-08)
      Tsunami-induced pedestrian evacuation for the community of Perryville is evaluated using an anisotropic modeling approach developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The method is based on path-distance algorithms and accounts for variations in land cover and directionality in the slope of terrain. We model evacuation of pedestrians to exit points located at the tsunami hazard zone boundary. Pedestrian travel-time maps are computed for two cases: i) travel to an existing evacuating shelter and ii) travel to either the evacuation or an alternative shelter. Results presented here are intended to provide guidance to local emergency management agencies for tsunami inundation assessment, evacuation planning, and public education to mitigate future tsunami hazards.
    • PEDESTRIAN TRAVEL-TIME MAPS FOR CORDOVA, ALASKA: An anisotropic model to support tsunami evacuation planning

      Macpherson, Amy; Gardine, Lea; Nicolsky, Dmitry (2020-06)
      Tsunami-induced pedestrian evacuation for Cordova is evaluated using an anisotropic modeling approach developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The method is based on path-distance algorithms and accounts for variations in land cover and directionality in the slope of terrain. We model evacuation of pedestrians to exit points from the tsunami hazard zone. The pedestrian travel is restricted to the roads only. Results presented here are intended to provide guidance to local emergency management agencies for tsunami inundation assessment, evacuation planning, and public education to mitigate future tsunami hazards.