Now showing items 41-60 of 12310

    • Snow avalanches are a primary climate-linked driver of mountain ungulate populations

      White, Kevin S.; Hood, Eran; Wolken, Gabriel J.; Peitzsch, Erich H.; Bühler, Yves; Jones, Katreen Wikstrom; Darimont, Chris T. (Springer Nature, 2024-04-29)
      Snow is a major, climate-sensitive feature of the Earth’s surface and catalyst of fundamentally important ecosystem processes. Understanding how snow influences sentinel species in rapidly changing mountain ecosystems is particularly critical. Whereas effects of snow on food availability, energy expenditure, and predation are well documented, we report how avalanches exert major impacts on an ecologically significant mountain ungulate - the coastal Alaskan mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus). Using long-term GPS data and field observations across four populations (421 individuals over 17 years), we show that avalanches caused 23−65% of all mortality, depending on area. Deaths varied seasonally and were directly linked to spatial movement patterns and avalanche terrain use. Population-level avalanche mortality, 61% of which comprised reproductively important prime-aged individuals, averaged 8% annually and exceeded 22% when avalanche conditions were severe. Our findings reveal a widespread but previously undescribed pathway by which snow can elicit major population-level impacts and shape demographic characteristics of slow-growing populations of mountain-adapted animals.
    • Perceived challenges to tribally led shellfish toxin testing in Southeast Alaska: Findings from key informant interviews

      Roland, Hugh B.; Kohlhoff, Jacob; Lanphier, Kari; Hoysala, Sneha; Kennedy, Esther G.; Harley, John R.; Whitehead, Christopher; Gribble, Matthew O. (John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2024-03-07)
      Shellfish harvesting is central to coastal Alaska Native ways of life, and tribes in Southeast Alaska are committed to preserving sustainable and safe access to subsistence foods. However, consumption of non-commercially harvested shellfish puts Alaska Native communities at elevated risk of exposure to shellfish toxins. To address a lack of state or federal toxin testing for subsistence and recreational harvesting, tribes across Southeast Alaska have formed their own toxin testing and ocean monitoring program. In this study, we interviewed environmental managers responsible for tribes' testing and others with shellfish toxin expertise to report on perceptions of barriers to tribally led testing in Southeast Alaska. Tribal staff identified 40 prospective key informants to interview, including all environmental managers responsible for shellfish toxin testing at subsistence sites in Southeast Alaska. All 40 individuals were invited to participate in an interview and 27 individuals were interviewed. The most frequently discussed barriers to shellfish toxin testing in Southeast Alaska relate to logistical and staffing difficulties associated with communities' remote locations, inconsistent and inadequate funding and funding structures that increase staff burdens, risk communication challenges related to conveying exposure risks while supporting subsistence harvesting, and implications of climate change-related shifts in toxin exposures for risk perception and risk communication. Participants stressed the social origins of perceived barriers. Disinvestment may create and sustain barriers and be most severely felt in Native communities and remote places. Climate change impacts may interact with social and cultural factors to further complicate risk management.
    • Glaciers, snow, and rain: Water source influences invertebrate community structure and secondary production across a hydrologically diverse subarctic landscape

      Dunkle, Matthew; Bellmore, J. Ryan; Fellman, Jason; Caudill, Christopher C. (John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2024-02)
      The melting cryosphere adds heterogeneity to the abiotic and biotic characteristics of many high latitude and montane rivers. However, climate change threatens the cryosphere's persistence in many regions. While existing research has explored the impacts of cryospheric loss on the diversity and structure of freshwater communities, implications for functional traits of communities, such as production of aquatic invertebrates, remain unresolved. Here, we quantified aquatic invertebrate community structure and secondary production in southeast Alaska (USA) streams that represent a meltwater to non-meltwater gradient, including streams fed primarily by: (1) glacier-melt, (2) snowmelt, (3) rainfall, and (4) a combination of these sources. We found alpha diversity was highest in the snow-fed stream and lowest in the glacier-fed stream. Annual secondary production was also lowest in the glacier-fed stream (0.56 g ash-free dry mass m−2), but 2–5 times higher in the other stream types primarily due to greater production of shared taxa that were found in all streams. However, despite low invertebrate diversity and productivity, the glacier-fed stream hosted distinct species assemblages associated with unique cycles of stream flow, water temperature, turbidity, and nutrient concentrations, which contributed to higher beta diversity between streams. Our findings suggest that the loss of glacier-melt contributions to rivers may result in increased freshwater invertebrate production but reduced beta diversity, which could have implications for community stability and the capacity of landscapes to support higher-level consumers, including fishes.
    • Explorations 1998

      Petersen, Art; Silva, Ron; Tersteeg, Alice; Everest, Kathleen (University of Alaska Southeast, 1998)
      Explorations ‘98, in its 17th year, is sponsored by generous support from the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS), a volunteer editorial board, and reader fees from poets and writers across Alaska, the U.S., Canada, and Europe.
    • Explorations 1997

      Petersen, Art (University of Alaska Southeast, 1997)
      Explorations ‘97, in its 16th year of continuous publication, is sponsored by generous support from the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS), a volunteer editorial board, and reader fees from poets and writers across Alaska, the U.S., Canada, and Europe.
    • Explorations 1996

      Petersen, Art; Penny, Hattie (University of Alaska Southeast, 1996)
      Explorations ‘96 is published with generous support from the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS) School of Education, Liberal Arts, and Science, a volunteer editorial board, and reader fees from poets and writers from across Alaska, the U.S., Canada, and Europe.
    • Explorations 1994

      Petersen, Art; Currier, Erika (University of Alaska Southeast, 1994)
      Explorations ‘94, entering its 15th year, is published with support from the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS) School of Education, Liberal Arts, and Sciences, the United Students of UAS in Juneau, and the Chancellor’s Office.
    • Explorations 1993

      Petersen, Art; Silva, Ron; Rose, Patty (University of Alaska Southeast, 1993)
      Explorations ‘93, entering its 14th continuous year, is published with the support of the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS) School of Education, Liberal Arts, and Sciences, the United Students of UAS in Juneau, and the Chancellor’s Office.
    • Integrated Land Use Planning for Sustainable Communities on the Seward Peninsula; An Assessment of Potential Mining Development and Indigenous Livelihoods

      Akogun, Ridwan (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2024-05-01)
      Graphite is a critical mineral in pursuing the goal of “decarbonizing the economy” in the U.S. and currently, the U.S. imports 100% of its graphite from other countries. The most significant demand driver for graphite is lithium-ion batteries, which powers carbon-free technologies to reduce global warming. The recent discovery of a substantial, high-grade graphite deposit in Alaska’s Seward Peninsula has triggered the proposal of a large-scale graphite mining project and generated immense government support for local production. It is critical to examine the potential socio-economic and environmental impacts of the proposed mining project on project- zone communities of Nome, Teller, Brevig Mission and Mary’s Igloo. Existing literature reveals the correlation between mining impacts and their spatial extent, species susceptibility, intensity, and public health implications for communities. This study’s methodology includes spatial analysis of 20-year subsistence and sport harvest data of important species from reporting zones or UCUs (Uniform Coding Units) and rivers on Alaska’s Seward Peninsula, to determine critical harvest locations and estimate their degree of overlap with 1-, 5-, and 10-mile buffers of mining impact extent. We evaluated socio-economic impacts through local employment estimates, royalties and tax structures, and compensation to Native organizations and relevant stakeholders. Analysis shows overlap with habitats and migratory routes of important species and Areas of Critical Environmental Concerns (ACEC), as well as economic opportunities for local communities. Estimating cumulative impacts of the proposed large-scale mine is critical for effective resource management planning and policymaking in the Seward Peninsula in the face of “green transition”.
    • Explorations 1992

      Petersen, Art; Silva, Ron (University of Alaska Southeast, 1992)
      Explorations ‘92, entering its 13th continuous year, is published with the support of the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS) School of Education, Liberal Arts, and Sciences and the United Students of the University of Alaska Southeast in Juneau.
    • Explorations 1991

      Petersen, Art; Silva, Ron (University of Alaska Southeast, 1991)
      Explorations ‘91, entering its 12th continuous year, is published with the cooperation and support of the School of Education, Liberal Arts, and Sciences and the United Students of the University of Alaska Southeast in Juneau.
    • Explorations 1990

      Petersen, Art; Silva, Ron (University of Alaska Southeast, 1990)
      Explorations 1990, entering its eleventh year of continuous publication, is published with the cooperation of the University of Alaska Southeast; works do not necessarily reflect the views of the university. Explorations receives grants from the School of Education, Liberal Arts, and Science and the United Students of the University of Alaska Southeast in Juneau.
    • How much does Alaska spend on K-12 education? Research Summary

      DeFeo, Dayna Jean; Berman, Matthew; Hill, Alexandra; Hirshberg, Diane (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-09-30)
      Education funding in Alaska, as in most states, is one of the largest allocations in the state operating budget. In 2017, Alaska’s K-12 per-pupil spending was $17,838, which is 46% higher than the national average. However, a lot of things in Alaska are expensive relative to national averages: healthcare, food, and energy, to name just a few. In this paper we adjusted Alaska’s data from the US Census Bureau 2017 Annual Survey of School System Finances to state and national cost indices, and find that Alaska’s per-pupil expenditures are on par with national averages. As many drivers of Alaska’s education costs extend beyond education policy, we caution against cuts that leave districts with few choices but to diminish the teacher workforce by eliminating positions or hiring lower quality teachers with less competitive salaries.
    • Nonconsensual Contact, Repeated Nonconsensual Contact, and Fear: Findings from the 2020 Alaska Victimization Survey

      Shimizu, Rei; Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Information Center, 2024-03-22)
      Using data from the 2020 Alaska Victimization Survey (AVS), this report examines nonconsensual contact, repeated nonconsensual contact, and the fear felt by those who experience nonconsensual and repeated nonconsensual contact. All percentages included in the report are weighted. Hence, the data is representative of population estimates, namely noninstitutionalized English-speaking adult women residing in Alaska.
    • Anchorage Community College Commencement Program. May 1987

      University of Alaska Anchorage, 1987-05-07
      These official programs are distributed to attendees of the annual commencement ceremonies. The programs include the event schedule as well as the degrees and honors awarded, listing recipients of the degrees and honors. May 1987
    • Anchorage Community College Commencement Program. May 1985

      University of Alaska Anchorage, 1985-05-09
      These official programs are distributed to attendees of the annual commencement ceremonies. The programs include the event schedule as well as the degrees and honors awarded, listing recipients of the degrees and honors. May 1985
    • Anchorage Community College Commencement Program. May 1984

      University of Alaska Anchorage, 1984-05-11
      These official programs are distributed to attendees of the annual commencement ceremonies. The programs include the event schedule as well as the degrees and honors awarded, listing recipients of the degrees and honors. May 1984
    • Anchorage Community College Commencement Program. May 1973

      University of Alaska Anchorage, 1973-05-11
      These official programs are distributed to attendees of the annual commencement ceremonies. The programs include the event schedule as well as the degrees and honors awarded, listing recipients of the degrees and honors. May 1973
    • Anchorage Community College Commencement Program. May 1972

      University of Alaska Anchorage, 1972-05-05
      These official programs are distributed to attendees of the annual commencement ceremonies. The programs include the event schedule as well as the degrees and honors awarded, listing recipients of the degrees and honors. May 1972
    • Anchorage Community College Commencement Program. May 1971

      University of Alaska Anchorage, 1971-05-09
      These official programs are distributed to attendees of the annual commencement ceremonies. The programs include the event schedule as well as the degrees and honors awarded, listing recipients of the degrees and honors. May 1971