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Browsing Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station (AFES) by Issue Date

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Browsing Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station (AFES) by Issue Date

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  • Georgeson, C. C. (Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1902)
    A study of the agricultural resources and capabilities of Alaska was begun under authority of Congress in 1898. Results of the earlier preliminary surveys seemed to justify the continuation and extension of the work and ...
  • Georgeson, C. C. (Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1905)
    In this bulletin an attempt is made to present in an assimilated form what experiments and experience have taught as the best practice for vegetable growing in Alaska. It is of course understood that it is utterly ...
  • Ross, P. H. (Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1907)
    During the haymaking season the weather along the Alaskan coast is generally so unfavorable, with prolonged intervals of rain, a sun whose beams are daily growing weaker, and shortening hours of work, that the statement ...
  • Georgeson, C.C. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations, 1916)
    This circular is designed to give prospective settlers in Alaska, and particularly homesteaders, information on subjects which will be of more or less vital interest to them. It is designed also to call their attention ...
  • Georgeson, C. C. (Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1923-10)
    Alaska is a vast country of very diverse physiographic configuration, lying between latitudes 54° 40' and 71° 20' N. and longitudes 130° W. and 172° E., and covering an area of 580,000 square miles. It has two climatic ...
  • Georgeson, C. C.; White, W. T. (Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1924-01)
    Southwestern Alaska is eminently fitted for cattle raising, particularly Kodiak Island, where nutritious grasses grow in abundance and there is little timber, the vegetation being mainly bushes, grasses, and other low-growing ...
  • Georgeson, C. C.; Gasser, G. W. (Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1926-05)
    Prior to the establishment of the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations it was almost universally believed that Alaska was a frozen, inhospitable wilderness, and therefore worthless for agricultural purposes. Even as ...
  • Georgeson, C.C. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations, 1928-10)
    The information in this circular is intended for the use of settlers and homesteaders in Alaska who are interested in the more general growing of hardy flowering bulbs in the Territory. Alaska is very poor in native ...
  • Georgeson, C. C. (Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1928-11)
    This bulletin is intended for settlers and prospective settlers in Alaska and for others who may be interested in gardening in the Territory. The information given is based upon the results of investigations by the Alaska ...
  • Georgeson, C. C. (Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1929-01)
    So far as is known the Russians were the first people of the Caucasian race to settle in Alaska. They early recognized the possibilities of Alaska for stock-breeding purposes and imported cattle from Siberia in the belief ...
  • Alberts, H. W. (Office of Experiment Stations, United States Department of Agriculture, 1931-07)
  • Langdale, Elizabeth H. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations, 1932-04)
  • Higgins, F. L. (Office of Experiment Stations, United States Department of Agriculture, 1932-06)
    The oat crop occupies an important place on the farms in interior Alaska, especially in the Matanuska Valley and the Fairbanks region of the Tanana Valley. The crop is used chiefly for hay. It is one of the more important ...
  • Alberts, H. W. (Office of Experiment Stations, United States Department of Agriculture, 1933-05)
    The principal crops on which the development of agriculture in the Matanuska region 1 depends are grown primarily as a feed for livestock. So far as is known, Fred Herning in 1906 was the first person to grow forage crops ...
  • Higgins, F.L. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1933-05-31)
    Many requests for information regarding the best varieties of field crops for interior Alaska have been received by the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations. Field crops have- been tested by the stations in the ...
  • White, W.T. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations, 1933-10)
    The information given in this circular is drawn from the experience of the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations in handling their dairy herd at the Matanuska station and from other authoritative sources.
  • Irwin, Don L. (Agricultural Experiment Stations, University of Alaska, 1945-11)
    As early as 1898 investigations of the agricultural possibilities in Alaska were begun along the southern coast and westward along the Aleutian Islands. In the reports of these investigations frequent reference is made to ...
  • Ebert, W.J. (University of Alaska Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations, 1945-11)
    Forage production for wintering livestock in Alaska has long been a problem where cleared land is limited. In the vicinity of the Knik Arm of Cook Inlet there are tide flats where native grasses grow in such abundance ...
  • Balloun, Stanley L. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1948)
    LAYING HENS PROVIDE a year-round income, utilize off-season labor, help build a permanent system o f agriculture in Alaska.
  • Edgar, Alfred D.; Irwin, Don (U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1948-05)
    “P O T A T O E S are an important food in Alaska. Matanuska V alley farmers can produce enough to meet the needs of the Anchorage area if the crop can be kept satisfactorily from one year to the next. The Alaska ...

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