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Better Understanding the Modifiers of Domestic Water Consumption: An Investigation Project

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dc.contributor.author Lespin, Eric J.
dc.date.accessioned 2014-08-07T21:23:58Z
dc.date.available 2014-08-07T21:23:58Z
dc.date.issued 2014-04
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11122/4348
dc.description Presented to the Faculty of the University of Alaska Anchorage in partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH en_US
dc.description.abstract Around the world different living circumstances have an enormous yet poorly quantified impact on human water consumption. Water consumption levels are in turn closely linked to health and quality of life, particularly where access to water is limited. These facts place significant water and health impacts in the hands of those who make design and implementation decisions about living circumstances – professionals who are not necessarily experts in matters of water. This investigation was an examination of the abundant yet discordant and atomized data on human water consumption, providing a summary of water consumption modifiers and water consumption numbers over a wide range of circumstances, in table form, to those involved with dwelling infrastructure, water/sanitation, hygiene, or other water-impacted fields. Disambiguation of the water consumption concept was necessary, which encompasses three categories of consumption: footprint, domestic, and ingestion. Footprint water consumption was documented to be greater than domestic consumption by an order of magnitude. Domestic consumption was found to be ~99% defined by our surroundings and to vary between 7 and 600 lpcd. Principal modifiers of domestic consumption are service level, sanitation decision (dry vs. flush), presence of metering, use of low flow fixtures, residential lot or compound size, and climate. Sanitation decision is linked to substantial health externalities. Price appeared to have a less-than-anticipated impact, due likely to social/health restraints in applying strict economic principles. Dwelling size was found not to be a modifier. Relative impact of modifiers discussed. en_US
dc.description.tableofcontents Signature Page / Title Page / Abstract / Acknowledgements / Table of Contents / List of Figures / List of Tables / List of Appendices / Abbreviations and Acronyms / Prologue / Background and Context / A Review of the Literature / Research Goals, Questions, Objectives / Methodology / Finding an Initial Reference Point - What Constitutes Water Consumption? / The Water Footprint and Water Scarcity / Water for Human Waste Carriage / Metering / Service Levels / Conservation Technology and Education / Wealth and Water Prices / Dwelling Use / Household Size / Lot or Compound Size and Climate / Altitude Within System and Water Line Pressure / Traditional Sources and Improved Water Supplies / Results / Discussion / References / Appendices / Executive Summary / Endsheet en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Alaska Anchorage en_US
dc.title Better Understanding the Modifiers of Domestic Water Consumption: An Investigation Project en_US
dc.type Report en_US


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