ScholarWorks@UA

Blackfish Lessons on Environmental Sustainability, Food, and Indigenous Culture

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Swensen, Thomas
dc.date.accessioned 2017-09-11T17:41:33Z
dc.date.available 2017-09-11T17:41:33Z
dc.date.issued 2017-09-11
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11122/7858
dc.description.abstract This essay, “Blackfish Lessons on Environmental Sustainability, Food, and Indigenous Culture,” examines Yup’ik interventions into understanding the place of human-nonhuman animal relations in regard to ecological sustainability. In lending consideration to Indigenous culture, the first part of the essay explicates the Yup’ik way of living, the Yuuyaraq, and its relationship to the environment. Then the essay turns toward two Yup’ik stories about blackfish, John Active’s “Why Subsistence is a Matter of Cultural Survival: A Yup’ik Point of View” (2001) and Emily Johnson’s “Blackfish,” taken from The Thank-You Bar recorded performance (Johnson, 2009), that speak to the imbrications of Indigenous culture and the environment. en_US
dc.title Blackfish Lessons on Environmental Sustainability, Food, and Indigenous Culture en_US
dc.type Article en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search ScholarWorks@UA


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account

Statistics